2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 08, 2019  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

ECONOMICS (EC)

  
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    EC 450. International Trade (3)


    Analysis of principles underlying international trade, commercial policy, free trade, GATT, and application of these principles and policies. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in   and  .
  
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    EC 470. Mathematical Economics (3)


    Application of selected Economics and Finance problems designed to prepare students for graduate work in Economics and Finance. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  EC 301 .

EDUCATION (ED)

  
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    ED 300. Introduction to Teaching and Learning (3)


    Content includes qualities needed by the teacher, opportunities for employment, financial compensation and other rewards, requirements for certification, responsibilities of the educator candidate, what the teaching act involves, a systematic approach to the application of psychology to the learning process, and the requirements of the UWA educator preparation program. The formal application for “Admission to Educator Preparation” will be made during the course. Fingerprinting is a course requirement. Prerequisites: 45 semester hours of earned credit. MH 113  and EH 101 .
  
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    ED 303. P-12 Classroom Management (3)


    This course is designed for educator candidates to gain an understanding of best practices in classroom organization and management. The focus of the course will be on Alabama Quality Teaching Standards that address learning environment, relationships, intrinsic motivation, responsibility, and character education.
  
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    ED 333. Reading Methods Secondary/P-12 (3)


    An overview of methods and techniques of teaching reading as related to different content areas. Field experience is required. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 335. Field Experiences P/12 I (1)


    On-campus seminars and field based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools. Extensive field work and completion of a technology portfolio is required. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance by first day of class. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 336. Field Experiences P/12 II (1)


    On-campus seminars and field based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools. Extensive field work and completion of a technology portfolio is required. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance by first day of class. Prerequisite or co-requisites: ED 333 . Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 381. Middle School Curriculum and Methods (3)


    The theoretical and practical bases of decision-making regarding learning, alternatives at the middle school level. Includes educational concepts, curriculum materials and instructional strategies. Prerequisite/Corequisite:  ED 300 .
  
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    ED 382. Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3)


    Students develop competencies in methods of teaching language arts. The preparation of unit plans and lesson plans as well as an overview of Educate Alabama skills are essential parts of the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 383. Methods of Teaching Mathematics (3)


    Students develop competencies in methods of teaching mathematics. The preparation of unit plans and lesson plans are essential parts of this course. Prerequisites: Junior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 384. Methods of Teaching Physical Education (3)


    Students develop competencies in methods of teaching physical education. The preparation of unit plans and lesson plans are essential parts of the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 385. Methods of Teaching Science (3)


    Students develop competencies in methods of science. The preparation of unit plans and lesson plans are essential parts of the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 386. Methods of Teaching Social Science (3)


    Students develop competencies in methods of teaching social science. The preparation of unit plans and lesson plans are essential parts of the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 400. Measurement and Assessment (3)


    An overview of the methods and techniques of evaluation in the teaching-learning process. Includes preparation and evaluation of teacher-made tests and evaluation and interpretation of standardized tests. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and unconditional admission to EDPP. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 405. Technology and Education (3)


    An overview of the methods and techniques in computer assisted instruction, current issues, and hardware and software as they relate to the educational process. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 408. Technology Portfolio (1)


    Students will prepare a portfolio that provides evidence of technological abilities as required by the State of Alabama. Prerequisites: ED 405 . Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 409. Internship, Pre-School through Grade Twelve (12)


    Assignment to a cooperating school(s) at the appropriate level for one full semester (constitutes the student’s load). Includes full-time participation in classroom activities and teaching. Also includes extra-class and community activities. Campus seminars will also be held to discuss problems and issues. Prerequisites: Unconditional admission to Educator Preparation Program, passing score on Praxis II, fingerprint clearance, and successful completion of Field Experiences.
  
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    ED 435. Field Experiences P-12 III (1)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools. Extensive field work and completion of the technology portfolio is required. Prerequisites: ED 405 , Senior standing, ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance, and unconditional admission to Educator Preparation Program. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 436. Field Experiences P-12 IV (1)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools. Extensive field work and completion of the technology portfolio is required. Prerequisites: ED 405 , Senior standing, ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance, and unconditional admission to Educator Preparation Program. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 497. Independent Study in Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in education. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: ED 405 , Permission of the Dean. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .
  
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    ED 498. Selected Topics in Education (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: ED 405 , Permission of the Dean. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 300 .

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EP)

  
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    EP 098. Reading Skills Improvement (3, Non-Degree Credit)


    Improvement of vocabulary, comprehension, and speed.
  
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    EP 400. Educational Psychology (3)


    Survey course in research-based concepts and principles about human learning, development, and motivation. Application of theories of development to the classroom.

  
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    EP 402. Introductory Career Psychology (3)


    Vocational behavior and development. Prerequisites: PY 200 .
  
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    EP 406. Child and Adolescent Development (3)


    Covers the development of the physiological, psychological, social, cognitive and affective aspects of children and adolescent development.
  
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    EP 497. Independent Study in Educational Psychology (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in educational psychology. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. May be repeated for six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
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    EP 498. Selected Topics in Educational Psychology (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in educational psychology not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (EE)

  
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    EE 300. Effective Teaching and Learning (3)


    This course investigates techniques, strategies, and curriculum design in the elementary grades. Educator candidates learn how to integrate content areas, effective teaching and learning strategies, and methods for problem-solving/critical thinking. Prerequisites: Junior standing.
  
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    EE 301. Methods of Teaching Reading (3)


    Stages of developmental reading, organizational patterns, methods and materials for classroom application. Concurrent courses which must be taken prior to Senior Block: EE 304 , EE 324 , and EE 328 . Prerequisites: Junior standing and EE 300  or permission of the Chairperson.
  
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    EE 303. Classroom Management for Elementary Teachers (3)


    This course will focus on building classroom management in the elementary classroom.
  
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    EE 304. Literature for Children and Young Adults (3)


    Study of the reading interests and needs of children and young adults. Emphasis is placed on evaluating major genre of literature. Programming for both recreation and instruction is included. Concurrent courses which must be taken prior to Senior Block: EE 301 , EE 324  and EE 328 . Prerequisites: Junior standing.
  
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    EE 324. Methods of Teaching Social Studies (3)


    Integrated approach to teaching social studies, including global perspectives, materials, and current technology. Concurrent courses: EE 301 , EE 304 , and EE 328 . Prerequisites: Junior standing.
  
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    EE 328. Elementary Field Experiences I (3)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools two full days each week twelve to fourteen weeks. Concurrent courses which must be taken prior to Senior Block: EE 301 , EE 304 , and EE 324 . Prerequisites: EE 300 , junior standing, and ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance.
  
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    EE 402. Problems of Teaching Reading (3)


    Causes of reading disability, informal diagnosis and interpretation of reading ability; application of materials and strategies. Concurrent courses: ED 408 , EE 423 , EE 425 , EE 426 , and EE 428 . Prerequisites: Junior block, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
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    EE 423. Methods of Teaching Mathematics (3)


    Designed to help students gain familiarity with the mathematics curriculum, develop skills in planning and teaching, and further understanding of mathematical concepts and how they are developed. Concurrent courses: ED 408 , EE 402 , EE 425 , EE 426 , and EE 428 . Prerequisites: Junior block, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
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    EE 425. Methods of Teaching Science (3)


    Designed to help students gain familiarity with the science curriculum, develop skills in planning and teaching, and further their understanding of science concepts. Concurrent courses: ED 408 , EE 402 , EE 423 , EE 426 , and EE 428 . Prerequisites: Junior block, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
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    EE 426. Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3)


    An integrated approach to teaching language arts, including current methods, materials and technology. Concurrent courses: ED 408 , EE 402 , EE 423 , EE 425 , and EE 428 . Prerequisites: Junior block, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
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    EE 428. Elementary Field Experiences II (3)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools two full days each week for twelve to fourteen weeks. Concurrent courses: ED 408 , EE 402 , EE 423 , EE 425 , and EE 426 . Prerequisites: Junior block courses, junior standing, and ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
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    EE 497. Independent Study in Elementary Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in elementary education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
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    EE 498. Selected Topics in Elementary Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in elementary education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS)

  
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    EMS 101. Emergency Medical Responder (3)


    Prepares the student to provide initial stabilizing care to the sick or injured prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services Professionals (EMS), and to assist EMS personnel in transporting patients for definitive care at an appropriate hospital/facility. Major areas of instruction include Introductory Medical Terminology and Anatomy & Physiology; Responder Safety; Incident Command; Bloodborne Pathogen Training; Basic Physical Assessment; and Treatment of Trauma and Medical Emergencies; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the use of Automatic External Defibrillators. The course is a blend of lecture, hands on lab/learning, and practical scenario based learning/testing. The course will include Healthcare Provider CPR/AED Certification from a Nationally Recognized Body (American Heart Association, Red Cross, etc). Topics include: Preparatory; Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Pathophysiology; Life Span Development; Public Health; Pharmacology; Airway; Management; Respiration and Artificial Ventilation; Assessment; Medicine; Shock and Resuscitation; Trauma; Special Patient Populations; EMS Operations; and Integration of Patient Assessment and Management. Demopolis Higher Education Center
  
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    EMS 189. Applied Anatomy and Physiology for the Paramedic (3)


    This course introduces human anatomy and physiology and includes concepts related to basic chemistry: fluid, electrolyte, and acid-based balance; functions of cell, tissue, organs, and systems; pathophysiology, and associated medical terminology.  Emphasis is placed on applying content to signs, symptoms, and treatments and in situations commonly seen by paramedics.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the structure and function of the human body.  Prerequisite:  admission to the Emergency Medical Services degree program. Prerequisites: Admission to the Emergency Medical Services degree program. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 200. Basic Emergency Care (6)


    Includes all required modules of the 1994 EMT Basic National Standard Curriculum; patient assessment, airway management, hemorrhage control, management of fractures, care of special injuries, emergency childbirth, environmental emergencies, transportation of the sick and injured, and radio communications. Prerequisites: Current American Red Cross Professional Rescuer CPR/AED or American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Providers CPR certification. Corequisites: EMS 205  and EMS 206 .
  
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    EMS 205. Basic Emergency Clinical Internship (1)


    Pre-hospital care and transportation of the sick and injured using principles of basic life support, correlated with emergency room experience. Time distributed between emergency room, ambulance, communications center, and interfacility transport vehicle. Prerequisites: Current American Red Cross Professional Rescuer CPR/AED or American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Providers CPR certification.
      Corequisites: EMS 200  and EMS 206 .
  
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    EMS 206. Basic Skills Laboratory (1)


    Basic Emergency Medical Technician Skill practicum. Designed to allow Basic EMT students extensive practice of required psychomotor skills. Prerequisites: Current American Red Cross Professional Rescuer CPR/AED or American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Providers CPR certification. Corequisites: EMS 200  and EMS 205 .
  
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    EMS 240. Paramedic Operations (3)


    This course focuses on the operational knowledge and skills needed for safe and effective patient care within the paramedic’s scope of practice.  Content areas include:  research, paramedic roles and responsibilities, well-being of the paramedic, illness and injury prevention, medical-legal-ethical issues, therapeutic communications, medical terminology, life span development, ambulance operations, medical incident command, rescue awareness and operations, hazardous materials incidents, crime scene awareness, and Alabama EMS laws and rules. Prerequisites: EMS 189.  Corequisites: EMS 243, EMS 244, and EMS 245. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 241. Paramedic Cardiology (3)


    This course introduces the cardiovascular system, cardiovascular electrophysiology, and electrocardiographic monitoring.  This course further relates pathophysiology and assessment finds to the formulations of field impressions and implementation of treatment plan for specific cardiovascular conditions.  Content areas include:  cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, cardiovascular electrophysiology, electrocardiographic monitoring, rhythm analysis, and pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram monitoring and interpretation, assessment of the cardiovascular patient, pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and techniques of management including appropriate pharmacologic agents and electrical therapy.  Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 243, EMS 244, and EMS 245.  C Corequisites: EMS 242, EMS 246, and EMS 248. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 242. Paramedic Patient Assessment (3)


    This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to perform a comprehensive patient assessment, make initial management decisions, and to communicate assessment findings and patient care verbally and in writing.  Content areas include airway management, history taking, techniques of the physical examination, patient assessment, clinical decision making, communications, documentation, and assessment based management. Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 243, EMS 244, and EMS 245. Corequisites: EMS 241, EMS 246, and EMS 248. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 243. Paramedic Pharmacology (3)


    This course introduces basic pharmacological agents and concepts with an emphasis on drug classifications and the knowledge and skills required of a paramedic for safe, effective medication administration.  Content areas include:  general principles of pharmacology and pharmacologic pathophysiology; venus and intraosseous access techniques, the metric and apothecary system; computation of dosage and solution problems, administration of pharmacologic agents; pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and nasogastric tube placement.  Prerequisites: EMS 189.  Corequisites: EMS 240, EMS 244, and EMS 245. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 244. Paramedic Clinical I (3)


    This course is directed toward the application of knowledge and skills developed in didactic and skills laboratory experiences to the clinical setting.  Theory and skills are applied to a variety of patient situations in the clinical setting, with a focus on patient assessment and management, advanced airway management, electro-therapy, IV/IO initiation and medication administration.  Prerequisites: EMS 189.  Corequisites: EMS 240, EMS 243, and EMS 245.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 245. Paramedic Medical Emergencies (3)


    This course relates pathophysiology and assessment findings to the formulation of field impressions and implementation of treatment plans for specific medical conditions.  Content areas include pulmonology, neurology, gastroenterology, renal/urology, toxicology, hematology, environmental conditions, infectious and communicable diseases, abuse and assault, patients with special challenges, and acute interventions for the chronic care patient.  Prerequisites: EMS 189.  Corequisites: EMS 240, EMS 243, and EMS 244. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 246. Paramedic Trauma Management (3)


    This course relates pathophysiology and assessment findings to the formulation of field impressions and implementation of treatment plans for trauma patients.  Content areas includes the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of trauma as related to:  trauma systems; mechanisms of injury; hemorrhage and shock; soft tissue injuries; burns; and head, facial, spinal, thoracic, abdominal, and musculoskeletal trauma. Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMs 240, EMS 243, EMS 244, and EMS 245.  Corequisites: EMS 241, EMS 242, and EMS 248.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 247. Paramedic Special Populations (3)


    This course relates pathophysiology and assessment findings to the formulation of field impressions and implementation of treatment for specific medical conditions.  Content areas include:  endocrinology, allergies and anaphylaxis, behavioral/psychiatric conditions, gynecology, obstetrics, neonatology, pediatrics, and geriatrics.  In the clinical setting, theory and skills are applied to a variety of medical situations across the life span of the patient, with a focus on communication with and management of cardiac, acute care, psychiatric/behavioral, obstetrical, newborn, pediatric, geriatric, and acute interventions for chronic care patients, and patients with special challenges.  Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 242, EMS 243, EMS 244, EMS 245, EMS 246, and EMS 248.  Corequisites: EMS 253, EMS 255, EMS 256, and EMS 257. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 248. Paramedic Clinical II (3)


    This course is directed toward the application of knowledge and skills developed in didactic and skills laboratory experiences to the clinical setting.  Theory and skills are applied to a variety of medical and trauma situations across the life span of the patient, with a focus on communication with and management of trauma, cardiac, acute care, psychiatric/behavioral, obstetric, newborn, pediatric, geriatric, and acute interventions for chronic care patients, and patients with special challenges.  Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 243, EMS 244, and EMS 245. Corequisites: EMS 241, EMS 242, and EMS 246.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 253. Paramedic Transition to the Workforce (3)


    This course is designed to meet additional state and local educational requirements for paramedic practice.  Content may include pre-hospital protocols, transfer medications, topics in critical care and transport, system presentation, and/or national standard certification courses as dictated by local needs or state requirement. Prerequisites:   EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 242, EMS 243, EMS 244, EMS 245, EMS 246, and EMS 247.  Corequisites: EMS 247, EMS 254, EMS 255, and EMS 256.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 254. First Aid, CPR, AED for Nursing (2)


    Study of first aid, safety, and CPR for the professional rescuer. Includes administering emergency oxygen, bloodborne pathogen training, and basic management of musculoskeletal injuries, mild traumatic brain injury and heat illness. The student will take the arc certifying exams in community FA and CPR Professional Rescuer-AED. Prerequisites: Eligibility for admission to the nursing program.
  
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    EMS 255. Paramedic Field Preceptorship (3)


    This course provides field experience in the pre-hospital setting with advanced life support EMS units.  Under the direct supervision of a field preceptor, students synthesize cognitive knowledge and skills developed in the skills laboratory and hospital clinical to provide safe and effective patient care in the pre-hospital environment.

      Prerequisites:   EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 242, EMS 243, EMS 244, EMS 245, EMS 246, and EMS 248.  Corequisites: EMS 247, EMS 253, EMS 256, and EMS 257.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

  
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    EMS 256. Paramedic Team Leader (3)


    This course is designed to evaluate the student’s ability to integrate didactic, psychomotor skills, clinical, and field internship instruction to serve as a competent entry-level paramedic.  This final evaluative (rather than instructional) course focuses on the student’s professional attributes and integrative competence in clinical decision-making and team leadership in the pre-hospital setting.  Upon completion, the student should have demonstrated adequate knowledge and skills, professional attitudes and attributes, clinical decision-making and team leadership abilities to effectively function as a competent entry-level paramedic.   Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 242, EMS 243, EMS 245, EMS 246, and EMS 248.  Corequisites: EMS 247, EMS 253, EMS 255, and EMS 257.  Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 257. Advanced Competencies for the Paramedic (3)


    This course is designed to assist students in preparation for the paramedic licensure examination.  Emphasis is placed on validation of knowledge and skills through didactic review, skills lab performance, and/or computer simulation and practice testing. Prerequisites: EMS 189, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 242, EMS 243, EMS 244, EMS 245, EMS 246, and EMS 248. Corequisites: EMS 246, EMS 253, EMS 255, and EMS 256. Offered at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  
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    EMS 300. Advanced Concepts for the AEMT (3)


    This course serves as the introductory course to the advanced level practice of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT). It expands on the information attained at the EMT level. Topics include: EMS Systems; Documentation; EMS System Communication; Therapeutic Communication; Principles of Pharmacology; Medication Administration; Emergency Medications; Airway Management; Respiration; Artificial Ventilation; Primary Assessment; and Secondary Assessment. Prerequisites: Licensure or eligibility for licensure at the EMT level.
  
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    EMS 301. Advanced Patient Care for the AEMT (3)


    This course provides opportunities to apply fundamental knowledge of basic and selected advanced emergency care and transportation based on assessment findings for the following: an acutely ill patient; a patient in shock, respiratory failure or arrest, cardiac failure or arrest, and post resuscitation management; and an acutely injured patient. In addition it provides a fundamental knowledge of growth, development, and aging and assessment findings to provide basic and selected advanced emergency care and transportation for a patient with special needs. Topics include: Geriatrics; Patients with Special Challenges; Medical Overview; Neurology; Immunology; Infectious Disease; Endocrine Disorders; Cardiovascular; Toxicology; Respiratory; Hematology; Genitourinary/Renal; Shock and Resuscitation; Chest Trauma; Abdominal and Genitourinary Trauma; Orthopedic Trauma; Head, Facial, Neck, and Spine Trauma: Nervous System Trauma; and Integration of Medical/Trauma Assessments. Prerequisites: Licensure at the EMT level.  
  
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    EMS 302. Clinical Applications for the AEMT (1)


    This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. Topics include: Clinicals. Prerequisites: Licensure at the EMT level. Corequisites:  .
  
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    EMS 303. Clinical and Practice Applications for the AEMT (3)


    This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings as well as opportunities to demonstrate critical thinking skills and assessment based management techniques through competency based evaluations relevant to the practice of an AEMT. Topics include: Clinicals and Assessment Based Management. Prerequisites: Licensure at the EMT level. Corequisites:  .

ENGLISH (EH)

  
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    EH 099. Fundamentals of Writing (3, Non-Degree Credit)


    Required of students needing additional work in usage, mechanics, spelling, basic grammar, and paragraph and essay writing. Entering freshmen and upperclassmen assigned on basis of test scores or referral by Written English Proficiency Committee. A grade of “C” or above is required to pass this course. Passing grade required before registering for EH 101 .
  
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    EH 101. Written English I (3)


    Training in expository writing through frequent exercises, essays, and consultation. A grade of “C” or above is required to pass this course.
  
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    EH 102. Written English II (3)


    Training in expository writing, especially analysis, argumentation, and research writing. A grade of “C” or above is required to pass this course. Prerequisites: EH 101 .
  
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    EH 103. Honors English I (3)


    Training in expository writing with enhanced opportunities for the pursuit of excellence. A grade of “C” or above is required to pass this course. Prerequisites: ACT composite score of 22 or higher and an ACT English score of 24 or higher.
  
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    EH 104. Honors English II (3)


    Continued training in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research writing. A grade of “C” or above is required to pass this course. Prerequisites: EH 103  with a “C” or higher or ACT composite score of 28 or higher and an ACT English score of 28 or CLEP or AP score at requisite level. Students meeting one of the three latter requirements and successfully completing EH 104 will also earn three hours credit in EH 103 .
  
  •  

    EH 200. Technical Communications (3)


    Instruction in the production of technical and/or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation. Prerequisites:   or   and   and  .
  
  •  

    EH 213. Honors Literature I (3)


    Designed to provide enhanced challenges and opportunities for excellence in the study of literature. Various critical approaches are used in intensive analyses of English, American, and other literatures. Prerequisites: 2.5 average in EH 103  and EH 104  or 3.5 GPA in EH 101  and EH 102 .
  
  •  

    EH 214. Honors Literature II (3)


    Designed to provide enhanced challenges and opportunities for excellence in the study of masterpieces of world literature. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 213  or 3.5 GPA in EH 101  and EH 102 .
  
  •  

    EH 221. British Literature I (3)


    Survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 102  or EH 104 .
  
  •  

    EH 222. British Literature II (3)


    Survey of British literature from the Romantics to the present. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 102  or EH 104 .
  
  •  

    EH 231. American Literature I (3)


    Survey of American literature from its earliest beginnings to 1865. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 102  or EH 104 .
  
  •  

    EH 232. American Literature II (3)


    Survey of American literature from 1865 to the present. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 102  or EH 104 .
  
  •  

    EH 300. English and Careers (1)


    Exploration and preparation for English majors for career and graduate school possibilities.
  
  •  

    EH 301. Advanced Composition (3)


    Advanced training in prose composition, primarily argumentation, with emphasis on concepts of audience, voice, structure, and logical development, as well as improvement of individual style. Prerequisites: EH 102  or EH 104 .
  
  •  

    EH 302. Introduction to Research (3)


    Basic procedures of research for literary studies. Must be taken before or concurrently with any literature course at the 300 level or above, except with permission of the Dean. Prerequisites: Three hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 310. Popular Culture (3)


    Study of a popular genre, theme, or mode such as science fiction, the detective story, or film. Specific course content will vary, and the course may be repeated once for a total of six credit hours provided that both courses cover substantially different material. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 311. Women’s Literature (3)


    A study of works of selected women writers from the medieval period to the present. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 315. Topics in World Literature (3)


    A study of a particular period, genre, or topic, traced through non-British and American literature, such as that of ancient Greece and Rome, Eastern literatures, and European literature.  Specific course content will vary, and the course may be repeated once for a total of six credit hours provided that the courses cover substantially different material. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 330. African-American Literature (3)


    A study of literature by African-American authors from the days of slavery to the present. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 335. Southern Literature (3)


    Authors, works, and literary movements associated with the American South. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 369. Poetry Writing Practicum (1)


    Peer critiques and completion of a creative writing project in poetry. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Languages and Literature.
  
  •  

    EH 370. Creative Writing (3)


    Peer critiques and the opportunity to write short stories, creative essays, and/or poetry. Prerequisites: Six hours of literature on the 200 level or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 379. Fiction Writing Practicum (1)


    Peer critiques and completion of a creative writing project, either in poetry, fiction, drama, or essay. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Languages and Literature.
  
  •  

    EH 397. Independent Study in English (1-3)


    Independent study in some area or areas of literature, linguistics, and composition. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. A maximum of six hours may be earned in this course. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 410. Twentieth-Century Poetry (3)


    A study of works of major American and British poets of the twentieth century from Thomas Hardy to the present, including Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Plath. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 421. Chaucer and Selected Medieval Literature (3)


    A focus on the Canterbury Tales, with additional readings of poems, mystery plays, and romances by other authors. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 422. Shakespeare (3)


    A study of Shakespeare’s works, with a focus on the tragedies from Romeo and Juliet through Macbeth. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 423. English Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3)


    A study of the poetry of John Donne and the Metaphysical poets, Ben Jonson and the Cavalier poets, and John Milton, primarily Paradise Lost. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302 allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 424. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3)


    British prose, poetry, and drama from 1660 to 1800, including such writers as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 425. Nineteenth-Century English Poetry (3)


    Selections from the poetry of major Romantic and Victorian poets. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 426. The English Novel (3)


    Examination of six to eight works of various periods and types in the development of the English novel. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 432. William Faulkner (3)


    A study of the fiction of William Faulkner.  Concurrent enrollment in   is allowed. Prerequisites:  
  
  •  

    EH 436. The American Novel (3)


    A study of the novel in the United States, as revealed in close examination of six to eight novels. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 440. Literary Criticism (3)


    A study of traditional and contemporary criticism and theory. Concurrent enrollment in EH 302  allowed. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 450. Contemporary Fiction (3)


    A study of fiction written in English, as revealed in an examination of 6-8 works written from 1955 to present. Prerequisites: EH 302 .
  
  •  

    EH 460. Advanced Grammar and Linguistics (3)


    Survey and analysis of traditional, structural, and transformational systems of grammar. Prerequisites:  
  
  •  

    EH 470. Advanced Creative Writing (3)


    For students who have earned credit in EH 370  and other qualified students, an opportunity to continue their writing.
 

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