2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 08, 2019  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

ENGLISH (EH)

  
  •  

    EH 480. Teaching Composition (3)


    Preparation for the teaching of writing, emphasizing the presentation of content in an organized, well-developed, and stylistically correct manner. Prerequisites: EH 102  or EH 104  and EH 301 .
  
  •  

    EH 488. Field Experience in English Language Arts Teaching (3)


    Tutoring of students in English Language Arts classes or in the Writing Center under the supervision of a classroom teacher; observation and assistance to the classroom teacher, two to three days a week. Prerequisites: “C” or above in EH 301  or EH 480 .
  
  •  

    EH 489. Tutorial Practicum for Teachers (1)


    Tutoring in the Writing Center under the supervision of the Director. May be repeated for maximum of three semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean or  “C” in both EH 301  and EH 460 .
  
  •  

    EH 498. Selected Topics in English (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)

  
  •  

    ESL 099. Fundamental Academic English Skills for Non-Native Speakers (3, non-degree credit)


    Designed for non-native speakers with intermediate-low proficiency in English. Semi-intensive, multi-skills course that focuses on writing, listening, reading, oral communication, and grammar skills essential in any academic setting.
  
  •  

    ESL 101. Written and Oral Academic English for Non-Native Speakers I (3)


    Training in academic writing and oral communication skills for non-native speakers with intermediate-high proficiency in English. Emphasis on basic elements of academic writing: essay structure, paragraph structure, paraphrasing and summarizing, complex sentences, and grammar. Students write argumentative essays and practice oral communication skills, including pronunciation.
  
  •  

    ESL 102. Written and Oral Academic English for Non-Native Speakers II (3)


    Training in academic writing and oral communication skills for non-native speakers with advanced proficiency in English. Emphasis on critical reading of academic texts, analysis, and research paper development (planning, developing research questions, and finding, evaluating, and integrating sources). Students also practice oral presentation of their ideas and arguments.
  
  •  

    ESL 103. Advanced Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers of English (3)


    Training in advanced academic writing for non-native speakers that will serve specifically as an introduction to upper-level coursework. Students will use academic databases and learn important aspects of academic writing. There will also be an emphasis on oral presentation of research projects.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (EN)

  
  •  

    EN 100. Introduction to Environmental Sciences (4)


    Interdisciplinary approach to environmental imperatives involving the natural sciences, sociology, psychology, and economics. Outside projects and reports required. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    EN 307. Independent Study in Environmental Sciences (1-8)


    Content and nature of the course determined by individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 308. Seminar in Environmental Sciences (1)


    Use of the library and methods of literature search including computer access of literature databases. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites:   or  .
  
  •  

    EN 340. Coastal Zone Management (2)


    Ecological features and policies of physical management for coastal communities with a description of relevant federal and state programs. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    EN 360. Environmental Chemistry (3)


    Chemical processes in the air, water, and soil with an emphasis on the sources and effects of pollution. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of chemistry.
  
  •  

    EN 400. Senior Seminar (1)


    A capstone course in which students of environmental sciences consolidate their academic experience and develop skills necessary to enter the work force or to further their education in graduate programs of biological or environmental sciences. This course will also be used to evaluate the efficacy to which departmental objectives are being accomplished. To be taken the penultimate semester of the degree program unless earlier permission is granted by the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    EN 404. Research Design and Data Analysis (3)


    A study of the planning, organizing, and implementing of scientific research experiments. Computer based data treatment, graphing, and analysis methods are covered in detail. Prerequisites: MH 246  and 20 hours in biology and/or environmental science or permission of the Dean. Computer proficiency in Microsoft Excel and Word is critical.
  
  •  

    EN 409. Environmental Sciences Internship (12)


    To be eligible for internship, a student must complete all other course requirements in the Environmental Sciences Comprehensive pattern and apply through the Environmental Sciences Coordinator for the internship which is approximately 12 weeks in duration. The grade is based upon a written report submitted by the student and an evaluation submitted by the Intern Site Director.
  
  •  

    EN 416. Endangered Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of the federally listed plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, distribution, pertinent environmental factors, and conservation efforts for each species. The legal process of how a species becomes federally listed is also considered.
  
  •  

    EN 417. Invasive Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of invasive plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, pertinent environmental factors, biological strategies and control efforts for each species. The overarching impact to the natural landscape and how they impact humans is also considered.
  
  •  

    EN 418. The Tombigbee River (4)


    A two-week ecological field study of the Tombigbee River basin. Participants travel the basin by land and water while camping. Topics covered will include the relevant geology, hydrology, ecology, economics, water quality, and history of the Tombigbee River basin.
  
  •  

    EN 441. Environmental Toxicology (4)


    Overview of concepts and terminology combining several diverse disciplines to investigate how society creates, regulates, and perceives the effects of toxic substances in the environment. Health issues and approaches to control the major environmental health problems associated with various occupations in industrialized and developing countries will also be examined. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 453. Appalachian Ecology (4)


    A study of the biodiversity and geology of the Appalachian Mountains with particular focus on unique biological communities and the impact of natural and anthropogenic events on the landscape and ecology. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 454. Conservation Biology (3)


    This course provides an introduction to the field of conservation biology and examines the relationship between human populations and biodiversity. Project required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  •  

    EN 455. Ecological Management (3)


    Management methods and factors affecting successful management of natural resources, with a look at several specific habitat types.  Online only.
  
  •  

    EN 456. Ecological Restoration (3)


    Exploration of basic principles of ecological restoration including physical, chemical, and biological manipulations required for restoration success. Additionally, this course will provide a detailed examination of practical aspects of restoration in selected ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Twenty hours in environmental science and/or biology or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 457. Natural History of the Black Belt (3)


    The Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi is a unique and culturally significant region characterized by its geography, soils, prairies, and people. Experts in different fields survey the geography, history, archaeology, geologic history, paleontology, hydrology, biology, ecology, economics, and future of grassland, forest, aquatic, and urban environments of the Black Belt region. Three lecture hours per week and two Saturday field trips. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.
  
  •  

    EN 458. Subtropical Ecology (4)


    This course will provide an introduction to habitats and ecosystems of subtropical Florida. Students will gain insight into the natural and cultural history of some of the most unique and diverse habitats in North America. The course will include weekly meetings to discuss subtropical habitats, followed by a field trip. Upon return, students will develop a research paper and a presentation on a topic related to these habitats. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    EN 480. Environmental Law (3)


    Governmental regulations that seek to insure the quality of the environment and the safety of the work place. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 495. Research in Environmental Sciences (3)


    Research experience in the environmental sciences in which the student learns to conduct research by engaging in an ongoing research project of the faculty in the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean and instructor.
  
  •  

    EN 498. Selected Topics in Environmental Sciences (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

EXERCISE SCIENCE (EX)

  
  •  

    EX 240. Foundations of Exercise Science (3)


    An introduction to the field of exercise science. Exploration of career options, professional organizations, and certification programs within exercise science. Includes a basic survey of exercise physiology, nutrition, health-related fitness, performance-related fitness, sports medicine, biomechanics, sports psychology, motor learning and motor development.
  
  •  

    EX 241. Strength, Speed, and Power Training (2)


    Theory and basis in strength, speed, and power training program design.
  
  •  

    EX 242. Flexibility (2)


    Theory and basis in flexibility training program design.
  
  •  

    EX 246. Endurance Training (2)


    Theory and basis in muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance training program design.
  
  •  

    EX 345. Motor Learning and Motor Development (3)


    Concepts and process of life time motor skill acquisition and the variables that influence motor learning and performance. The student will be able to recognize motor development stages and apply concepts of motor learning in teaching motor skills. Prerequisites:  ,   or   and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 348. Personal Training (4)


    This course will prepare the student for ACSM personal trainer certification. This two semester course combination is designed to provide tools and scientific evidence in order to bring safe and effective exercise interventions to all individuals and promote whole body wellness. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:   and  .
  
  •  

    EX 349. Personal Training Practicum (1)


    With successful completion of PE 348, this course will provide practical application for the personal trainer. Under the tutelage of certified personal trainers, students will achieve a level of consistency in outcomes and validate a base level of knowledge. With course completion, students may sit for the ACSM Personal Training Certification exam. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    EX 397. Independent Study in Exercise Science (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in physical education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean and   or   and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 415. Sports Psychology (3)


    An investigation into theory and practice of Sports Psychology. Prerequisites: PY 355  and at least twelve semester hours in psychology or twelve semester hours in Exercise Science (EX) or Athletic Training (AH).
  
  •  

    EX 421. Measurement and Evaluation in Human Performance (3)


    Basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics used in human performance testing and research. Prerequisites: EX 240  and six (6) hours of Exercise Science, Athletic Training or Physical Education courses.
  
  •  

    EX 442. Sport and Exercise Nutrition (3)


    The role of diet in human performance. Prerequisites: BY 231  and AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 443. Kinesiology (3)


    Mechanical principles of body movements involved in various motor skills. Prerequisites:   and   or   or   and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 444. Exercise Physiology (3)


    Human adaptation to exercise and training. Prerequisites:   and   or   or   and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 445. Exercise Physiology Lab (1)


    Designed for Exercise Science Emphasis. Lab experience in spirometry, VO2 sub maximal and maximal testing with the bicycle ergometer, field testing VO2, strength testing, power testing, blood pressure testing, muscular endurance testing, lactate testing, nutritional assessment, EKG testing, and blood sugar testing. Prerequisites: AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and 6 hours of Athletic Training or Physical Education.
  
  •  

    EX 446. Biomechanics of Human Movement (3)


    Biomechanical concepts critical to assessment, description, and qualitative analysis of human movement in exercise, sport, and locomotive activities are studied. Prerequisites: EX 443  or PE 443   and six (6) hours of Exercise Science, Athletic Training or Physical Education courses.
  
  •  

    EX 449. Exercise Science Internship (9)


    Three hundred sixty hour field experience in an approved clinical, corporate, public, military, or commercial physical fitness facility/program.
  
  •  

    EX 451. Exercise Testing and Prescription (3)


    A standardized curriculum to train and develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities for the exercise and fitness professional.
  
  •  

    EX 459. Sports Psychology Practicum (1)


    Thirty-hour field experience working with an approved athletic team. Prerequisites: Written approval of the Chair of Behavioral Sciences.
  
  •  

    EX 470. Development of Strength and Conditioning Programs (3)


    The development and administration of strength, endurance, flexibility, speed, and agility programs. Prerequisites: AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and 6 hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 472. Performance Enhancement Specialist (3)


    Designed for athletic trainers, chiropractors, physical therapists, coaches and other sports professionals who want to work with players at all levels, from the secondary education and university tier, to professional and Olympic level athletes. With course completion, students may sit for the NASM Performance Enhancement Specialist (NASM PES) certification exam. Prerequisites: Approval of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    EX 474. Corrective Exercise Specialist (3)


    Provides the advanced knowledge, skills and abilities to successfully work with clients suffering from musculoskeletal impairments, imbalances or post-rehabilitation concerns. With course completion, students may sit for the NASM Corrective Exercise Specialist (NASM CES) certification exam. Prerequisites: Approval of Department Chair.
  
  •  

    EX 475. Emergency Management of Athletic Injuries (1-3)


    Current methods of emergency medical treatment of athletic injuries, proper recognition, management, and transportation of acute athletic injuries and illnesses. Course may be taken or repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 476. Sports Medicine Seminar and Workshop (1-3)


    Current knowledge, philosophies, and trends in sports medicine and athletic training. Prevention, recognition, treatment, and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries/illnesses. Presentations and some experience in taping and evaluation provided. Course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    EX 498. Selected Topics in Exercise Science (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in physical education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research paper required. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.

FINANCE (FI)

  
  •  

    FI 300. Finance (3)


    Survey of financial management of the private firms, with emphasis on financial statements, sources of capital, and management of fixed assets. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in EC 202  and “C” or higher in AC 211  or AC 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 310. Managerial Finance (3)


    Financial management, emphasizing analytical frameworks in finance, including cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, financial analysis, forecasting and resource allocation. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 320. Interest Theory and Fixed Income Analysis (3)


    In-depth treatment of the time value of money, including the use of the financial calculator. In addition, the course includes the analysis of fixed income investments, including pricing, risk assessment, and market characteristics. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 340. Investments (3)


    Role of securities markets in economic life, with attention to types of securities, purchase and sale of securities, factors influencing market price and the relation of stock speculation to the banking system and general economic conditions. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 350. Fundamentals of Risk Management and Insurance (3)


    A study of the insurance industry, including life and property insurance. Examines the different types of insurance contracts and gives an introduction to how insurance companies operate, specifically how they price insurance policies and plan for uncertain future payouts. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    FI 360. Principles of Real Estate (3)


    Fundamentals of real property, measurement and economic value, legal implications (with emphasis on Alabama law), financing, valuation, ethics, and the functions of the brokerage office. Prerequisites: AC 212 , BA 263 , EC 202 , FI 300 , and proficiency in business mathematics.
  
  •  

    FI 380. Computerized Financial Modeling (3)


    Analysis of financial concepts such as the time value of money, amortization, and asset pricing through computerized models. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 401. Ethics for Financial Professionals (1)


    This course explores ethical conduct in the finance profession, with a specific focus on the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct and the Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®). Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 407. Independent Study in Finance (1-3)


    Independent study in finance. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the students. Required research paper and projects. Maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    FI 408. Selected Topics in Finance (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, and discussions on subject matter so current that it is not generally included in other course offerings. Use of the Internet is part of this course. Offered on an irregular basis, based on student need and interest. Prerequisites: Senior standing.
  
  •  

    FI 410. Monetary Theory and Policy (3)


    Analysis of the origin and role of money as well as money supply. The course also examines the effects of monetary policy on the economy using money demand and money supply models. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 420. Asset Pricing and Portfolio Analysis (3)


    Analysis of the process of financial decision making and the role of financial markets, focusing on capital asset pricing theories as well as portfolio investment strategies in evolving financial market environments. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 440. Management of Financial Institutions (3)


    Analysis of the management of firms in the financial services industry, including risk management, investment banking, and global financial markets. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 450. International Financial Statement Analysis (3)


    Analysis of financial statements from a global perspective, with a primary focus on International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The tools of financial statement analysis will be used to evaluate companies and ultimately to make decisions regarding debt and equity investments. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 451. International Finance (3)


    Analysis of principles underlying the international securities market, international banking systems, exchange rates, currency markets, international portfolio investment, and current national policies. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    FI 460. Finance Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of finance theories and concepts. Corequisites: Senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.
  
  •  

    FI 480. Financial Derivatives (3)


    Analysis of financial derivatives such as futures, options, and other derivatives focusing on trading structures, pricing, strategies, hedging strategies, and regulations. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in FI 300 .
  
  •  

    FI 491. Senior Thesis I (1)


    Over the course of two semesters, students independently complete a comprehensive company analysis, including the use of discounted cash flow valuation. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in FI 300 
  
  •  

    FI 492. Senior Thesis II (1)


    Continuation of FI 491 . Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in FI 300 

FRENCH (FR)

  
  •  

    FR 101. Introductory French I (3)


    Basic reading, writing, oral comprehension, and speaking skills. Designed for students with no prior French or only one year of high-school French.
  
  •  

    FR 102. Introductory French II (3)


    A continuation of FR 101 . Prerequisites: FR 101  or equivalent or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    FR 201. Intermediate French I (3)


    Further training in the four language skills. Students with previous language training will be placed at appropriate level. Prerequisites: FR 102  or equivalent or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    FR 202. Intermediate French II (3)


    A continuation of FR 201 . Prerequisites: FR 201  or equivalent or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    FR 310. Readings in French Literature (1-3)


    Selected readings in French drama, fiction, and lyric poetry. Prerequisites: Permission of department.

GEOGRAPHY (GY)

  
  •  

    GY 100. Introduction to Geography (3)


    An introduction to the basic concepts of physical and human geography based upon the five basic themes of geography: location, place, relationships within places, movements, and regions.

GEOLOGY (GE)

  
  •  

    GE 102. Physical Geology (4)


    Introduction to geology, with emphasis on earth materials and modern processes including geologic hazards. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    GE 302. Marine Geology (4)


    A study of the geology of the ocean basins, with special emphasis on the continental shelves. Prerequisites: GE 102 , MH 246  recommended. (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    GE 370. Environmental Geology (4)


    Practical applications of geology to environmental issues such as natural hazards, waste disposal and pollution, discovery and exploitation of mineral, energy and water resources, land use planning, and environmental impact and related legal issues. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: GE 102 .
  
  •  

    GE 392. History of Life on Earth (4)


    A survey of life and geologic settings through time, including methods, principles of evolution and stratigraphy, practical experience and collecting and analyzing fossils, and cultural implications. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Eight hours of biology and GE 102 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    GE 463. Coastal Geomorphology (4)


    Coastal processes and features, including waves and currents, beaches, inlets, and coastal engineering structures. Includes several short cruises and other field trips. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    GE 468. Selected Topics in Marine Geology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics to be covered, such as marine paleoecology, recent marine sedimentation, or others. Prerequisites: Eight semester hours of geology and permission of the instructor and the Dean. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.

GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TESTING (GMAT)

Graduate Management Admission Testing

  
  •  

    GMAT 300. Graduate Management Admission Test Prep (1)


    The study of exam content, formatting, and scoring of the Graduate Management Admission Test. Students will explore content from two sections of the GMAT, verbal and quantitative. Prerequisites: MH 113 , EH 102 , and junior standing.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION (GRE)

  
  •  

    GRE 300. Graduate Record Examination Preparation (1)


    The study of exam content, formatting, and scoring of the Graduate Record Examination. Students will explore content from the three sections of the GRE, including analytical writing, verbal reasoning, and quantitative reasoning. Prerequisites:  ,  , and junior standing.

HISTORY (HY)

  
  •  

    HY 101. History of Western Civilization I (3)


    Survey of Western Civilization until 1500.
  
  •  

    HY 102. History of Western Civilization II (3)


    Survey of Western Civilization from 1500 to present. Emphasis on the rise of modern society. Prerequisites: HY 101 .
  
  •  

    HY 103. Honors Western Civilization (3)


    An in-depth survey of Western Civilization until 1500. Prerequisites: ACT composite score of 24 or higher and an ACT Reading score of 26 or higher.
  
  •  

    HY 104. Honors Western Civilization II (3)


    An in-depth survey of Western Civilization from 1500 to present, with emphasis on the rise of modern society. Students meeting one of the three latter requirements and successfully completing HY 104 will also earn three hours in HY 103 . Prerequisites: HY 103  with a “C” or higher or ACT composite score of 28 or higher and an ACT Reading score of 28 or CLEP or AP score at the requisite level.
  
  •  

    HY 211. American History I (3)


    Social, economic, and political aspects of American history from the discovery of the New World through the Civil War.
  
  •  

    HY 212. American History II (3)


    The development of the United States since the Civil War.
  
  •  

    HY 300. Historical Methodologies and Practices (3)


    A writing-intensive introduction to the theoretical and philosophical approaches to history. The class will prepare students for senior-level history courses and for their senior year seminar projects. Special attention will be paid to the conventions of historical writing and the historian’s craft. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and at least nine hours of 100 and 200-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 305. Fundamentals of Public History (3)


    An interdisciplinary introduction to public history, examining local history, archival management, historical archaeology, and museum studies. Prerequisites: HY 211 , HY 212 , and HY 300 .
  
  •  

    HY 306. Film and History (3)


    A survey of the history of film and the development of film within its cultural context. The course will include frequent discussions of the proper use of film in the classroom. Prerequisites: HY 102 , HY 104 , or HY 212 .
  
  •  

    HY 307. Fundamentals of Historic Preservation (3)


    An introduction to the field of historic preservation, and an examination of the development of U.S. preservation movements. Prerequisites: HY 300  and HY 305 .
  
  •  

    HY 308. The Military History of the United States, 1755-1975 (3)


    Analysis of the political, strategic, operation and tactical evolution of the United States Armed Forces from their employment during the French and Indian Wars through the Vietnam era.
  
  •  

    HY 310. Indians of North America (3)


    A survey of the prehistory, history, and contemporary issues of native peoples in North America.
  
  •  

    HY 311. Colonial and Revolutionary America (3)


    America from the Age of Discovery through the American Revolution and the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 311. Indians of Latin America (3)


    A survey of the prehistory, history, and contemporary issues of native peoples in Latin America.
 

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