2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Jan 27, 2020  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

HISTORY (HY)

  
  
  
  •  

    HY 314. The Civil War Era (3)


    United Stated politics and culture from the Mexican-American War through the end of Congressional Reconstruction. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  
  
  
  •  

    HY 318. History of Women in the US (3)


    This course will serve as a survey of the historical role and experiences of women in the US from pre-European contact to the present.
  
  •  

    HY 333. Europe in the 19th Century (3)


    Political, social, economic, and diplomatic developments in Europe from 1805 to 1918. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 335. Contemporary Europe (3)


    Political, social, economic, and diplomatic developments in Europe from 1945 to present. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 336. History of Women in Western Civilization (3)


    This course examines the historical and cultural roles of women from the beginning of humanity in western cultures up to the beginning of the 20th century.
  
  
  •  

    HY 342. History of England and Britain, 1689 to the Present (3)


    England and the British Empire from 1689 to the present. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 361. Latin America to 1810 (3)


    Latin American history from the pre-contact Amerindian cultures to the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 362. Latin America since 1810 (3)


    The Latin American nations from their independence struggles with Portugal and Spain to the modern era. Prerequisites: HY 300 or permission of the Chair.  
  
  •  

    HY 400. Seminar in Historical Studies (3)


    The capstone course for history majors, designed to provide training in the principles of historical research and writing. Substantial research paper required. History majors should take HY 400 in the first semester of their senior year. Prerequisites: Senior standing.
  
  •  

    HY 403. The First World War (3)


    A study of the origins of the First World War emphasizing the evolution of strategy, operations, and tactics. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 404. The Second World War (3)


    A study of warfare from 1931 through 1945, emphasizing strategy, operations and tactics. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 405. War of the Modern Age (3)


    The study of war and warfare from 1859 through September 11, 200 1, with an emphasis on the evolution of strategy, operations, and tactics. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 407. Independent Study in History (3)


    Independent study for qualified undergraduate students. Research project required. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300 level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 408. Cultural Resource Management (3)


    This course will introduce students to the theory, strategies and processes associated with Cultural Resource Management. Topics include an understanding of heritage preservation and management and its impact on our interpretations of the past. The importance of anthropological theory in CRM, along with the production and evaluation of CRM reports, evaluating significance of findings, assessing effect, and managing archaeological projects. Prerequisites: HY 307 .
  
  •  

    HY 409. Internship (3)


    Supervised internship with a departmentally-approved public history facility, archival institution, or historical journal. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: HY 300 , HY 307 , at least one class from the following:  HY 408 , HY 415 , HY 424 , HY 425 , HY 426 , or HY 485 ,  letter of agreement from the host institution and approval of both the supervising faculty member and the department chair.
  
  •  

    HY 410. American Diplomatic History (3)


    A study of the diplomatic events and foreign policy decisions in American history, with special emphasis on the United States as a world power. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 415. Fundamentals of Archival Theory and Practice (3)


    This course will introduce students to the fundamental theories of archives, including provenance and original order, as well as introduce them to basics of archival processing, through both class lecture and hands-on processing. Prerequisites: HY 305 .
  
  •  

    HY 418. U.S. Constitutional History I (3)


    An exploration of the cultural foundations of U.S. constitutional law and constitutionalism from the Glorious Revolution through 1868. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses
  
  •  

    HY 419. U.S. Constitutional History II (3)


    An exploration of the evolution of U.S. constitutional law and constitutionalism from 1868 through the 1980s. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 420. History of Alabama (3)


    A survey of the major developments and events in the history of Alabama from the colonial period until the twentieth century. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 421. History of the Old South (3)


    A survey of the history of the South to 1865. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 422. History of the New South (3)


    The development of the South since Reconstruction and the South’s place in the nation today. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 423. The Military History of the Civil War (3)


    A survey of the military campaigns of the American Civil War from Fort Sumter to Appomattox. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 424. Museum Studies (3)


    This course provides a broad overview of museums and their function. Topics covered will include the history, philosophy, purposes and administrative structure of various types of museums. Students will also be introduced to the variety of museum jobs including collections management, conservation, exhibition development, research, and educational programming. Prerequisites: HY 307 .
  
  •  

    HY 425. Oral History/Folklore (3)


    This course will train students to conduct oral history interviews and folklore field work. The course will cover advanced preparation for a recording, interview techniques, processing transcripts, utilizing equipment, as well as instructing students on practices for using the information in research and writing. Prerequisites: HY 307 .
  
  •  

    HY 426. Introduction to Historical and Natural Interpretation (3)


    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of cultural resources and to learn how to effectively interpret these resources through interactive programs and experiences. Prerequisites: HY 307 .
  
  •  

    HY 427. Indians of the Southeast (3)


    The prehistory and history of native cultures of Alabama and the Southeast, with an emphasis on archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric sources.
  
  •  

    HY 437. History of Nazism and Fascism (3)


    History of the rise of fascist regimes throughout Europe following the First World War with emphasis on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 451. History of Japan (3)


    Philosophy, geography, and history of Japan. Prerequisites:   and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 452. History of China (3)


    Philosophy, geography, and history of China. Prerequisites:   and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 457. Natural History of the Black Belt (3)


    A survey of the natural, environmental, cultural, and social history of the Black Belt region. Prerequisites:   and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 471. African-American History, 1400-1865 (3)


    The history of African-Americans from their roots in West Africa to emancipation in the United States. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 472. African-American History, 1866-Present (3)


    This history of African-Americans from emancipation to the present. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 473. Slavery in North America (3)


    A readings seminar in North American slavery concentrating on the primary literature and the evolution of interpretation. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 475. The Modern Civil Rights Movement (3)


    A study of the Civil Rights Movement from the New Deal to 1980. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 476. Comparative Slavery (3)


    A readings seminar examining the primary literature using the comparative approach to the study of slavery. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.
  
  •  

    HY 485. Fundamentals of Historical Archaeology (3)


    Explores archaeologists’ use of documentary evidence, oral history, and artifacts in interpreting social development in eastern North America from 1500 AD to 1900 AD. Prerequisites: AN 100  and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    HY 498. Selected Topics in History (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by students’ interests and instructor expertise. Prerequisites: HY 300  and at least six additional hours of 300-level history courses.

HOMELAND SECURITY (HS)

  
  •  

    HS 200. Homeland Security (3)


    This course will examine homeland security from the historical, economic, financial, social, natural disaster, military, national policy, and governmental perspectives. Strategic and tactical issues of national interests are examined from the perspective of the U. S. as a global power.
  
  •  

    HS 240. Emergency and Disaster Management (3)


    This course examines the history of emergency management; events of man-made and natural disasters; controlling, coordinating; leading, organizing, and planning activities during phases of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery; concepts of homeland security and civil defense; domestic and international incidents; technologies and resources of both the private and government sectors for managing emergencies and disasters.
  
  •  

    HS 250. Current Events in Homeland Security (3)


    This course examines current domestic and international events in the homeland security domain.  Topics vary per semester.
  
  •  

    HS 310. Terrorism (3)


    This course will examine terrorism from the historical, economic, financial, organizational, political, governmental, military, social, religious, and ideological viewpoints that affect U. S. policy and security. Potential threats to American security are discussed from the perspectives of domestic and international terrorism. Also examined are local, regional, national, and international aspects of terrorism.
  
  •  

    HS 320. Intelligence Analysis (3)


    Topics include the intelligence cycle and intelligence function; use of intelligence to support human decisions; types and forms of intelligence (e.g., SIGINT, HUMINT, etc.); national defense, policy, and security; business competitiveness and security; justice system issues; current events; and technological issues and resources to support intelligence activities.
  
  •  

    HS 330. Border Security (3)


    This course examines U.S. policy and security regarding both tangible and intangible borders. Topics include transportation systems; logistics; security threats, vulnerabilities, and risks; historical and modern border issues; maritime, land, and air boundaries; cyber-threats; border security technology; information processing and intelligence analysis; and both government and civilian issues.

HONORS PROGRAM (HR)

  
  •  

    HR 100. Honors Forum (1)


    Required of all students entering the Honors Program. Combines classwork, cultural activities and attendance at special events. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion with a “C” or higher of one of the honors versions of basic curriculum courses or permission of the Dean of Liberal Arts.
  
  •  

    HR 200. Honors Special Topics: Interdisciplinary (2)


    Interdisciplinary course, team taught by faculty from the four UWA colleges, focusing on a historical period or a fundamental issue or theme. Prerequisites: Sophomore status and Honors Forum with a “C” or higher or permission of the Dean of Liberal Arts.
  
  •  

    HR 307. Honors Mentored Studies (1)


    An opportunity for the student to work on a senior thesis under the guidance of a faculty member within the student’s major field.  May be repeated for a maximum of two semester hours. Prerequisites: Junior status and HR 200  with a “C” or higher or permission of the Dean of Liberal Arts.
  
  •  

    HR 407. Honors Thesis (1-2)


    Completion of the senior thesis begun in HR 307 . The student defends the completed work before a faculty committee. The thesis must be defended during or before the fifth week of the student’s graduating semester. (To earn two semester hours of credit, an honors student must complete additional research as required by the thesis mentor.) May be repeated for a maximum of two semester hours. Prerequisites: HR 307  with a “C” or higher.

JAPANESE (JP)

  
  •  

    JP 101. Introduction to Japanese I (3-4)


    An introduction to college-level Japanese language and culture. Designed for students with no prior Japanese or only one year of high-school Japanese.
  
  •  

    JP 102. Introduction to Japanese II (3-4)


    The course is the second semester of college-level study of Japanese. Continuation of written and oral skills in Japanese. Prerequisites: “C” or above in JP 101  or equivalent or permission of the Dean.

JOURNALISM (JN)

  
  •  

    JN 200. Introduction to Mass Communication (3)


    An introduction to media, including communication theory, media history, legal considerations, and the influence of technology in the shaping of modern communication practices.
  
  •  

    JN 219. Journalism Practicum: Print (1)


    Work on a University publication, either writing or a combination of writing with layout and/or photography. Maximum accumulated credit: eight semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    JN 240. Creative Photography (2)


    An introduction to the technical and creative aspects of photography, including use and manipulation of the camera, composition techniques, and digital postprocessing.
  
  •  

    JN 249. Photography and Vector Lab (1)


    Experiential instruction in the latest photography and graphics software programs.
  
  •  

    JN 250. Exploring Graphic Arts (2)


    The study of basic graphic design skills, and the conceptualization of ideas that develop the designer’s eye.
  
  •  

    JN 259. Journalism Practicum: Publishing (1)


    Performance of specific duties in the Livingston Press, achieving skills in publishing. Maximum accumulated credit: eight semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    JN 260. Graphic Design I (3)


    Theoretical and experiential instruction in creating professional, quality deliverables using Adobe Creative Cloud.
  
  •  

    JN 269. Journalism Practicum: Literary Magazine (1)


    Work on a University literary publication, either writing, editing, or layout. Maximum accumulated credit: two semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    JN 279. Journalism Practicum: Broadcast (1)


    Performance of specific duties in campus radio/television facilities. Maximum accumulated credit: eight semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    JN 320. Writing for the Mass Media (3)


    The study of the general principles of news writing for broadcast and print media. Students will learn about interviewing techniques, copy-editing, professional conduct, and news-gathering methods. Prerequisites: JN 200 .
  
  •  

    JN 325. Writing for Sports Media (3)


    The study and application of professional writing skills and formats commonly used in sports journalism, sports information, sports broadcasting, and sports marketing. Prerequisites: JN 320 .
  
  •  

    JN 340. Commercial Photography (2)


    The development and enhancement of advanced commercial photography for multi-media publication. Prerequisites: JN 240 .
  
  •  

    JN 350. Graphic Design II (3)


    The advanced study and application of corporate identity through the development of portfolio-based publications and collateral materials. Prerequisites: JN 260 .
  
  •  

    JN 360. Mass Media Design (3)


    Preparation of media messages for various formats including page layout, audio/visual formats, and computer design. Prerequisites: JN 200 .
  
  •  

    JN 370. Television Production (3)


    Production of radio and/or television news and feature stories, script writing, equipment operation, and on-camera technique. Prerequisites: JN 200  or JN 320 .
  
  •  

    JN 380. Media Buying (2)


    The study of media relations, client relations, and ad impressions in the implementation and measurement of media buying.
  
  •  

    JN 390. Sports Publications (3)


    The study and application of sports photography, writing, design, and layout in sports publications. Maximum accumulated credit: six semester hours.
  
  •  

    JN 395. Sports Media and Society (3)


    The study of current sociological, theoretical, legal, and ethical issues in the sports industry.
  
  •  

    JN 397. Independent Study in Journalism (1-3)


    Independent investigation of some area or areas of mass communications. Specific content and nature of study determined by student needs and interests. Maximum accumulated credit: six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    JN 420. Advanced Media Writing (3)


    The study of professional writing skills and formats commonly used in public relations, advertising, marketing, and digital communications. An emphasis will be placed on creativity, audience analysis, research, and interviewing. Prerequisites:   and  .
  
  •  

    JN 430. Media Ethics and Law (3)


    The study of the legal and ethical issues of media messages, with an emphasis on The First Amendment, privacy, and copyright infringement. Students will examine legal cases throughout history, legal ramifications of current technological advances, and the ethical situations that arise during the production of mass media messages. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    JN 450. Media Campaigns (3)


    The practice of public relations and advertising through the development of commercial touchpoints.
  
  •  

    JN 480. Advising Student Publications (3)


    Defines role of high school/college newspaper and yearbook advisors and explores advising techniques. Prerequisites: JN 200  or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    JN 490. Methods of Social Media (3)


    Theoretical and experiential instruction of the use of new and social media.

  
  •  

    JN 491. Sports Communications Internship (3)


    A minimum of 90 hours with a professional working in the sports communications field. Prerequisites: JN 320  and JN 350 .
  
  •  

    JN 495. Methods of Integrated Marketing Communications (3)


    The capstone course for Integrated Marketing Communications majors, designed to provide hands-on experience in developing, researching, and editing mass media messages that are both targeted and unified across multiple platforms. Prerequisites:  ,  ,  , and  .
  
  •  

    JN 498. Selected Topics in Journalism (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, and/or discussions of topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    JN 499. Professional Media Internship (3)


    Work a minimum of 135 hours with an appropriate media facility. Students must submit application for internship no later than the semester prior to enrollment in the course. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in a specified area of the mass media and permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Languages and Literature.

MANAGEMENT (MG)

  
  •  

    MG 300. Management (3)


    Basics of management thought and management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Prerequisites: AC 212  or AC 300 , and EC 201  .
  
  •  

    MG 310. Human Resources Management (3)


    Management of labor, including the selection, training and placement of personnel. Special management problems such as turnover, payment policies and employee representation. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 315. Project Management (3)


    A study of foundations of project management and project management techniques currently employed for business and information systems projects, including project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, and procurement. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 320. Labor Relations (3)


    Pertinent statutes and administrative and court rulings as a basis for determining the rights and obligations arising under laws such as the National Labor Relations Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 341. Entrepreneurship (3)


    This course examines the evolutionary role and creative function of managerial entrepreneurship in a diversity of business settings-small business, corporate, and non-profit organizations. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 370. Management Information Systems (3)


    This course focuses on the development and application of management information systems to business problems. Issues related to the use of computerized systems in the management of personnel and business information are explored through the use of microcomputers and software applications. Prerequisites: BQ 271  and “C” or higher in MG 300 .

     

  
  •  

    MG 390. Operations Management (3)


    A study of the theoretical concepts of management science with attention to planning and implementation of decision making in organizations using differing programming methods and decision models. Prerequisites: BQ 271  and C” or higher in MG 300 .

     

  
  •  

    MG 391. Logistics (3)


    Study of systems and processes which comprise supply chain management and transportation, quality assurance, maintenance, disaster logistics and systems of inventory management and control. Prerequisites: MG 390 .
  
  •  

    MG 407. Independent Study in Management (1-3)


    Independent study in management. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the student. Required research paper and projects. May be repeated for a maximum of three-semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    MG 408. Selected Topics in Management (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Content determined by student interest and need. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    MG 410. Leadership (3)


    Study of leadership theories. Includes identification, development, communication and ethics of leadership. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 440. International Management (3)


    Strategic and operational issues associated with managing international or multinational organizations. Global and domestic market forces, adjustments to traditional operations and business activities and cultural considerations affecting management of international business. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 450. Organizational Behavior (3)


    Analysis of organization practices and their application to both the business and industrial environments. Deals with behavioral science concepts such as motivation, conflict and communication. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    MG 460. Management Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of management theories and concepts. Prerequisites: senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.
  
  •  

    MG 490. Strategic Management (3)


    This is a case-driven, performance based course where students operate in a simulated business environment, employing skills in management, human resources, accounting, finance, marketing, and forecasting. Student should be in final semester of senior year. Prerequisites: Not accepted for transfer credit without Dean’s approval. Student must achieve a “C” or higher in this course.

MARKETING (MK)

  
  •  

    MK 300. Marketing (3)


    Survey course concentrating on the marketing environment and the marketing decisions regarding product, price, promotion and marketing channels. Prerequisites: EC 201 .
 

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