2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 08, 2019  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS)

  
  •  

    PS 353. American Political Thought (3)


    Emphasis on the theoretical background to the founding and current operation of the American Government. Prerequisites: PS 110 .
  
  •  

    PS 360. Methods of Social Research (3)


    An introduction to research methodology in the social sciences. Logic of research, sampling, techniques of data collection and analysis are discussed. Prerequisites: At least nine semester hours of political science.
  
  •  

    PS 370. Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)


    Basic statistical methods for analyzing data in the social sciences. Emphasis on describing distributions, sampling, measures of association, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: PS 110  and MH 113 .
  
  •  

    PS 498. Selected Topics in Political Science (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Prerequisites:   and permission of the instructor.

     

     


PSYCHOLOGY (PY)

  
  •  

    PY 100. General Psychology (3)


    Introduction to the study of behavior and mental processes.
  
  •  

    PY 101. Human Relations (3)


    This course focuses on readings, inter-and intrapersonal experiences, individual testing, employer visits, and open discussions. Its goal is to assist the student in making a successful transition from classroom to the world of work. This course will enable the student to identify the important role personal qualities play in the work environment, develop the success attitudes, interpersonal skills, and values that are demanded by employers, build on personality traits, work habits, thinking and self-employment skills, learn how to get along well with others in the workplace, resolve workplace conflict, manage business relationships, communicate well, and make good decisions.
  
  •  

    PY 103. Honors General Psychology (3)


    An in-depth introduction into the study of thoughts and behaviors. Prerequisites: Admission into the Honors Program or ACT reading score of 26 or higher.
  
  •  

    PY 176. Human Relations (3)


    This course focuses on readings, inter- and intrapersonal experiences, individual testing, employer visits and open discussions. Its goal is to assist the student in making a successful transition from classroom to the world of work.
  
  •  

    PY 200. History and Systems (3)


    Examination of the historical evolution of modern psychology and the resulting conceptual systems. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 300. Experimental Psychology (3)


    Introduction to basics of experimental design and analysis. Prerequisites: PY 200 .
  
  •  

    PY 310. Developmental Psychology (3)


    Examination of the process of human development throughout the entire life-span. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 320. Abnormal Psychology (3)


    Examination of historical trends, methods of treatment, and the dynamics of mental disorders. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 325. Physiological Psychology (3)


    Analysis of the structure and function of the brain and nervous system. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103  and BY 101 .
  
  •  

    PY 330. Social Psychology (3)


    Examination of the theories of human behavior in various social contexts. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 335. Comparative Psychology (3)


    A survey of the behaviors that have evolved to solve problems common to all species and the genetic and environmental determinants of those behaviors. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 340. Sensation and Perception (3)


    A study of the anatomical and functional characteristics of the sensory systems. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 350. Cognitive Psychology (3)


    A study of the mental representations used by the brain and the processes involved in manipulating those representations. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 355. Learning and Motivation (3)


    Analysis of theoretical positions, with an emphasis on basic principles of learning. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103 .
  
  •  

    PY 370. Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)


    Basic statistical methods for analyzing data in the social sciences. Emphasis on describing distributions, sampling, measures of association and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: PY 100  or PY 103  and MH 113 .
  
  •  

    PY 405. Professional Development in Psychology (1)


    Exploration of professional development strategies for students seeking continuing education or employment in psychology or related fields. Prerequisites: At least twelve (12) semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 407. Independent Study (1-3)


    Offers the undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in some area or areas of psychology. The specific content and nature of the courses are determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. Research projects and papers are required. A maximum of six semester hours credit is allowed in these courses. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    PY 408. Selected Topics (1-3)


    Offers qualified undergraduate students an opportunity for critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    PY 412. Psychology of Emotion (3)


    An investigation into theory, research, and application of the psychology of emotions. Prerequisites: At least twelve semester hours in Psychology (PY).
  
  •  

    PY 415. Sports Psychology (3)


    An investigation into theory and practice of Sports Psychology. Prerequisites: PY 355  and at least twelve semester hours in Psychology (PY) or twelve semester hours in Exercise Science (EX) or Athletic Training (AH).
  
  •  

    PY 420. Clinical Psychology (3)


    Introduction to clinical interview techniques, case studies, clinical testing, and psychotherapy. Prerequisites: PY 320  and at least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 425. Personality Assessment (3)


    Introduction to the theory and utilization of various assessment techniques in the analysis of personality. Prerequisites: PY 370  and at least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 428. Health Psychology (3)


    Introduction to the study of the interface between psychology and medicine. Prerequisites: BY 101  and at least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 436. Psychology of Women (3)


    This course will examine what it means to be female in our society and globally. Prerequisites: At least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 450. Theories of Personality (3)


    Comparative examination of representative theoretical approaches to the nature, determinants, and dynamics of personality structure. Prerequisites: At least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 459. Sports Psychology Practicum (1)


    Thirty-hour field experience working with an approved athletic team. Prerequisites: Written approval of the Chair of Behavioral Science.
  
  •  

    PY 460. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3)


    Examination of characteristics, interpretations, uses and misuses of standardized psychological tests. Prerequisites: PY 370  and at least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 480. Psychology Seminar (3)


    Students conduct independent research on a selected topic of current interest in the field of psychology based on a review of the literature and present the results of the study to their peers. APA style required. Prerequisites: At least fifteen semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 490. Psychology Research Project (3)


    An independent research project involving the collection and analysis of data and a paper written in APA style. Designed primarily for students seeking admission to a graduate program in psychology. Prerequisites: PY 300 , minimum of fifteen semester hours in psychology and permission of Chairperson.
  
  •  

    PY 495. Professional Orientation (3)


    Study of professional roles and functions, professional organizations and associates, ethical and legal standards, professional credentials, practice management, and procedures for licensure and certification. Prerequisites: At least twelve semester hours in psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 498. Psychology Research Practicum (3)


    Students will work a minimum of 90 hours under a qualified professor engaged in active psychological research. For Psychology majors only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours or taken once in combination with PY 499. Prerequisites:  , at least fifteen semester hours in psychology, a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in those courses, and written permission of the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    PY 499. Counseling/Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)


    Students will work 90 hours under a qualified professional in a mental health (or related) facility. For Psychology majors only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours or taken once in combination with  . Prerequisites: PY 320 , at least fifteen semester hours in psychology, a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in those courses, and written permission of the Chairperson.

SOCIAL WORK (SW)

  
  •  

    SW 100. Introduction to Social Work (3)


    An overview of fundamental concepts of social work and the many and varied roles in which social workers function in today’s society. Reviews the various fields of practice and the profession’s code of ethics, and covers current national and local issues.
  
  •  

    SW 200. History of Social Welfare (3)


    Study of the general institutional basis of social welfare: its historical development, cultural traditions, value orientations, and political and economic forces which have contributed to the emergence of present social welfare policies and systems in the United States. Prerequisites: SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 308. Selected Topics in Social Work (3)


    Examination of an important topic in contemporary social work. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours with permission of the department Chair. Topic varies from semester to semester. Prerequisites: SW 100  and permission of the Chair.
  
  •  

    SW 312. Child Welfare Services (3)


    Examination of the services provided by social workers to strengthen children, youth, and families. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SW 320. Cultural Diversity and Social Justice (3)


    Examines cultural, social and psychological implications of diverse lifestyles, and social injustices oppression and social injustices that are pertinent to social functioning and to the profession of social work. Prerequisites: SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 340. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)


    Emphasis is placed on understanding the individual in interaction with major social systems. The course will explore the interrelatedness of biological, social, cultural, psychological, and environmental factors in human behavior and development. Prerequisites: SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 360. Spirituality and Social Work Practice (3)


    This course guides students in examining their own spiritual perspectives and possible vehicle to facilitate client’s growth and change. Prerequisites: SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 370. Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)


    Basic statistical methods for analyzing data in the social sciences. Emphasis on describing distributions, sampling, measures of association, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: SW 100  & MH 113  (for SW students only).
  
  •  

    SW 398. Social Work Research Practicum (3)


    Students will work a minimum of 45 hours under a qualified Social Work professor engaged in active scholarly research.  For Social Work Minors only. Prerequisites:   and written permission of the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    SW 410. Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families (3)


    This course provides the foundation for beginning social work practice with individuals and their families. Prerequisites: Admission to the SW program and SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 415. Social Work and Human Sexuality (3)


    This course provides knowledge about physical, behavioral, cognitive, emotional and spiritual aspects of human sexuality at the micro and macro level. Prerequisites: SW 100 .
  
  •  

    SW 440. Forensic Social Work (3)


    An analysis of ways social workers practice within the criminal and civil court systems. Prerequisites: SW 100 .

SOCIOLOGY (SY)

  
  •  

    SY 100. Principles of Sociology (3)


    Basic concepts, methods and theory of sociological analysis. Examination of social structure, groups, culture, socialization, deviant behavior, stratification, race relations, population.
  
  •  

    SY 110. Social Problems (3)


    Analysis of problems of crime, drug abuse, sexual deviance, family disruption, inequality, population. Emphasis on causes, consequences, and solutions.
  
  •  

    SY 200. Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (3)


    Intermediate level analysis of the sociological craft. Knowledge and application of the academic writing, communication, critical reading, and empirical literacy skills used within the discipline. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 308. Selected Topics in Sociology (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Maximum accumulated credit: six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SY 311. Sociology of Aging (3)


    Analysis of the aging process experience as it is influenced by social and demographic factors, as well as the medical, social, and psychological consequences of aging, treatment, and leisure. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 312. Minority Relations (3)


    Analysis of minority relations in the United States and throughout the world, emphasizing factors producing changes taking place at the present time. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 314. Social Stratification (3)


    Analysis of social status systems, including class, caste, and estate. Emphasis on American class structure, life-style differences, and social mobility. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 322. The Community (3)


    Analysis of the community as a social system, including surveying the institutions, organizations, and agencies found in modern communities along with focusing on problems, forces and conditions involved in the trend toward overall planning. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 325. Sports in Society (3)


    Analysis of sports and sports-related behavior in social and cultural contexts. Emphasis on social problems in sports, sports and the economy, sports and the mass media, and racial, gender, and educational issues in sports. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 326. Sociology of Gender (3)


    Analysis of social construction, maintenance, and changes of gender roles in contemporary society, including the impact on education, economy, family, and the criminal justice system. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 335. Sociology of Work (3)


    Analysis of human relations in industrial society, including examining occupations, professions, and work with special attention given to human relations in industrial plants and other work situations. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 336. Marriage and the Family (3)


    The study of marriage and family relations, including the social function of the family and the social changes affecting family structure and functions. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 340. Population (3)


    Analysis of population size, composition, and distribution. Examination of demographic data sources, as well as population trends, theory, and problems. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 370. Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)


    Basic statistical methods for analyzing data in the social sciences. Emphasis on describing distributions, sampling, measures of association, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites:   and MH 113 .
  
  •  

    SY 381. Introduction to Criminology (3)


    Significance of the crime problem, sources of existing crime statistics, theories of criminal behavior, types of crime, and elements of criminal law. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    SY 382. The Criminal Justice System (3)


    Examination of formal processes and agencies established to treat criminal offenders. Role of the police, criminal court process, sentencing, and corrections are discussed. Prerequisites: SY 200 .
  
  •  

    SY 407. Independent Study in Sociology (3)


    Independent study in some area or areas of sociology with the specific content and nature of the course determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. Maximum accumulated credit: six semester hours. Prerequisites: At least twelve hours of SY or CJ beyond the 100 level and permission of dean.
  
  •  

    SY 450. Modern Sociological Theory (3)


    Analysis of the development of sociological theory with emphasis on major lines of development in modern theory. Prerequisites: At least twelve hours of SY or CJ beyond the 100 level.
  
  •  

    SY 460. Methods of Social Research (3)


    Advanced analysis and application of research methodology in the social sciences. Logic of research, sampling, techniques of data collection and analysis are discussed. Prerequisites: At least twelve hours of SY or CJ beyond the 100 level, including SY 370 .
  
  •  

    SY 495. Professional Orientation (3)


    Study of professional roles and functions, professional organizations and associations, ethical and legal standards, professional credentials, practice management, and procedures for licensure and certification. Prerequisites: At least twelve hours of SY or CJ beyond the 100 level.
  
  •  

    SY 498. Sociology Research Practicum (3)


    Students will work minimum of 90 hours under a qualified professor engaged in active sociological research. For Sociology Traditional Track majors only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites:  , at least 12 hours in Sociology beyond the 200 level, a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in those courses, and written permission of the Chairperson.

SPANISH (SP)

  
  •  

    SP 101. Introductory Spanish I (3)


    An introduction to college-level Spanish language and culture. Designed for students with no prior Spanish or only one year of high-school Spanish.
  
  •  

    SP 102. Introductory Spanish II (3)


    The course is the second semester of college-level study of Spanish.  Continuation of written and oral skills in Spanish. Prerequisites:  ”C” or above in SP 101  or equivalent or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SP 129. Spanish for Educators (3)


    Instruction and practice in Spanish phrases needed by school teachers, as well as basic Hispanic cultural background important to educators.
  
  •  

    SP 201. Intermediate Spanish I (3)


    Review and development of grammar and syntax; development of speaking, ready, and writing skills. Prerequisites: “C” or above in SP 102  or equivalent or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SP 202. Intermediate Spanish II (3)


    Review and development of grammar and syntax; development of speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisites: “C” or above in SP 201  or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SP 353. Spanish Conversation (3)


    This course introduces students to linguistic immersion in the target language. Prerequisites: SP 202   or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SP 356. Spanish Grammar and Composition (3)


    Review of Spanish grammar with emphasis on written expression in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP 353  or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SP 498. Selected Topics in Spanish (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Content determined by student interest and need. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SE)

  
  •  

    SE 301. Introduction to Collaborative Teaching in Special Education (3)


    This course provides an overview of the theory, methodology, and skills used by special educators in their interactions with students, parents/ families, school and agency personnel for service delivery to special needs students.
  
  •  

    SE 303. Behavior Management in the Classroom (3)


    This course is designed to provide career and future educators with the classroom management theories, techniques, trends and skills necessary to help the educator effectively deal with a broad range of behavior problems that may be encountered in the classroom.
  
  •  

    SE 305. Communication Skills for Exceptional Learners (3)


    This course focuses on assessment and remediation procedures for language arts skills and methods to augment communication skills including assistive technology.
  
  •  

    SE 328. Special Education Field Experiences I (3)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools two full days each week twelve to fourteen weeks. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance by first day of class. Corequisites: ED 333 .  ED 300 .
  
  •  

    SE 397. Independent Study in Special Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in special education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by the student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SE 400. Introduction to Special Education (3)


    Introduction to programs and problems of children and youth who deviate from the average in physical, mental, emotional, and social characteristics. Prerequisites: Admission to the Educator Preparation Program with the exception of Special Education majors.
  
  •  

    SE 401. Assessment and Diagnosis in Special Education (3)


    The focus of this course is on diagnosis, assessment, and interpretation as critical components of the decision-making process relative to what constitutes an appropriate educational program for individuals with disabilities.
  
  •  

    SE 402. Educational Programming for Low Incidence Disabilities (3)


    This course focuses on educational programming, assistive technology, and school health procedures that have been determined relevant for students with moderate or severe disabilities.
  
  •  

    SE 405. Teachers and the Law (3)


    This course is designed to provide educator candidates with the knowledge needed to prepare them for the role of the teacher as a professional in the field. The topics covered include law, ethics, advocacy and professional skills.
  
  •  

    SE 428. Special Education Field Experiences II (3)


    On-campus seminars and field-based tutoring of children, small group work, observation and assistance to classroom teacher(s) in cooperating schools two full days each week for twelve to fourteen weeks. Prerequisites: ED 405 , Senior standing, ABI/FBI fingerprint clearance, and unconditional admission to the Educator Preparation Program. Corequisites: SE 451 
  
  •  

    SE 451. Methods for Teaching Special Education K-12 (3)


    This course provides students with teaching methodology for educator candidates in grades K-12. It includes curriculum modification, transition planning and collaboration. Prerequisites: Admission to the Educator Preparation Program.
  
  •  

    SE 452. Transition Planning (3)


    This course provides educator candidates with teaching methodologies for students. It includes curriculum modification, transition planning and collaboration/coordination of services from early childhood through adulthood.
  
  •  

    SE 498. Selected Topics in Special Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in special education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of the course determined by the student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

SPEECH (SH)

  
  •  

    SH 100. Principles of Public Speaking (3)


    Instruction and practice in the techniques of effective public speaking.
  
  •  

    SH 150. Professional Speaking (3)


    General principles of oral communication in classroom and other professional situations, including voice production and enunciation, organization of information, and types of presentations.
  
  •  

    SH 310. Oral Interpretation (2)


    Analysis, interpretation, and oral presentation of prose, poetry, drama, and public speech before various types of audiences and microphone.
  
  •  

    SH 330. Interpersonal Communication (3)


    Examination of basic components of dyadic communication including listening, conflict management, perceptions, ethics, and overall effectiveness in interpersonal communication. Prerequisites: SH 100  or SH 150 .
  
  •  

    SH 350. Principles of Persuasion (3)


    Advanced practice in argumentation and an introduction to the principles of persuasion with an emphasis on contrasting public speaking to mass media. Prerequisites: SH 100  or SH 150 .
  
  •  

    SH 397. Independent Study in Speech (1-3)


    Independent study in speech communication. Specific content and nature of course dependent on individual needs and interests of student. Maximum six semester hours credit allowed. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SH 498. Selected Topics in Speech (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, discussions, and/or internship activities related to topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Maximum six semester hours of credit allowed. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

SPORTS MANAGEMENT (SM)

  
  •  

    SM 200. Introduction to Sport Management (3)


    Principles and practices associated with sport management. Emphasis on technology within sport management and career choices are discussed.
  
  •  

    SM 282. Teaching, Coaching and Officiating Sports (3)


    Rules, strategies, and skill techniques in traditional team sports and individual/non-traditional team sports.
  
  •  

    SM 336. Sport Management Seminar (3)


    Weekly seminar on sport management news. Prerequisites: PE 200 , EX 240 , or   and six hours of Athletic Training or Physical Education.
 

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