2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 08, 2019  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

SPORTS MANAGEMENT (SM)

  
  •  

    SM 407. Special Topics in Sport Management (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and group project related to Sports Management. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research paper required. Prerequisites:   and  .
  
  •  

    SM 409. Sport Management Practicum (3)


    Assignment(s) to an on-campus professional setting. Contact hours to integrate with major and minor emphasis. Will include participation, a journal, and supervision of advisor. Prerequisites:   and six hours of athletic training or physical education.
  
  •  

    SM 432. Organization and Administration in Human Performance (3)


    Concepts used in organization and administration of human performance programs. Management of personnel, equipment, supplies, facilities, finances, and records will be topics of discussion/lecture. Professional development and legal liability will also be addressed. Project required. Prerequisites: PE 200  or EX 240  or SM 200  and three hours of Athletic Training, Physical Education, or Sports Management.
  
  •  

    SM 433. Athletic Administration Seminar (3)


    Assist athletic directors and coaches in meeting increasing responsibilities of modern school athletic programs. Topics include problems in organizing and directing boys’ and girls’ (men’s and women’s) athletic programs. All levels of educational structure are considered.
  
  •  

    SM 434. Sport and Exercise Law (3)


    Legal aspects of sports activities and human performance. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: AH 200 or PE 200 or EX 240 and six hours of Athletic Training, Physical Education, or Sports Management.
  
  •  

    SM 435. Accounting and Economics in Sports (3)


    Exploration of financial issues pertaining to the sport industry. Emphasis placed on professional and collegiate sports.  Topics include the creation of balance sheets, income statements, cash basis versus accrual basis accounting; financial impact analysis, attendance/ticket sales analysis, and relationships between financial analysis and strategic planning are explored.
  
  •  

    SM 437. Sport Management and Marketing (3)


    Examination of strategic marketing, advertising, and public relation concepts in sport.  Project required.
  
  •  

    SM 439. Sport Management Internship (9)


    Multiple week field experience in an approved public or private setting engaging in the management, marketing, or communication of sporting activities. Prerequisites: At least thirty hours in physical education/sport management major.
  
  •  

    SM 450. Fitness Management (3)


    Coursework includes how management handles payroll, facility issues, safety, staffing, recruitment, and equipment purchases.
  
  •  

    SM 465. Psychology and Sociology of Human Performance (3)


    Psychological and sociological aspects of human performance. Prerequisites: AH 200  or PE 200  or EX 240  and six hours of Athletic Training, Physical Education, or Sports Management.
  
  •  

    SM 486. Intramural and Non-Competitive Activities (3)


    Planning and administration of an intramural sports program.  Research project required.

STUDENT AFFAIRS LEADERSHIP (SAL)

  
  •  

    SAL 300. Introduction to Student Affairs (3)


    The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the student affairs profession. Examines (a) essential skills and competencies (e.g., helping skills) of student affairs and higher education professionals, (b) functional areas in student affairs and higher education, and (c) an overview of student development theories and research.
  
  •  

    SAL 302. Seminar in College Leadership and Practice (3)


    Theories, philosophies, and practices (e.g., servant leadership, collaborative leadership, etc.) that frame the contemporary era of leadership in higher education.
  
  •  

    SAL 401. Management and Supervision of Student Affairs (3)


    Review of best practices related to the overall management and supervision of college student affairs programs.
  
  •  

    SAL 482. Assessment and Evaluation in Student Affairs (3)


    Covers theories and approaches to evaluation and outcomes assessment in student affairs.  Reviews the politics and economics of studying program effects.
  
  •  

    SAL 487. Current Issues and Trends in Student Affairs (3)


    Highlights current trends and issues in student services practices and analyzes the components of model programs in student services.
  
  •  

    SAL 489. Internship in Student Affairs (3)


    This course will provide students with 50 hours of practical field experience working in one functional area of student affairs under the supervision of a student affairs professional. Prerequisites: SAL 300 , SAL 302 , and SAL 401 .

STUDY ABROAD (ST)

  
  •  

    ST 301. Study Abroad I (1-9)


    Study aboard experience course one. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.
  
  •  

    ST 302. Study Abroad II (1-9)


    Study abroad experience course two. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.
  
  •  

    ST 303. Study Abroad III (1-9)


    Study abroad experience course three. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.
  
  •  

    ST 401. Study Abroad IV (1-9)


    Study abroad experience course four. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.
  
  •  

    ST 402. Study Abroad V (1-9)


    Study abroad experience course five. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.
  
  •  

    ST 403. Study Abroad VI (1-9)


    Study abroad experience course six. Prerequisites: Approved for study abroad credit by International Programs and written signature of the academic dean.

TECHNOLOGY (TY)

  
  •  

    TY 101. Introduction to Engineering Technology (1)


    A study of various career paths in engineering technologies, including biomedical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, manufacturing, mechanical, and robotics.
  
  •  

    TY 210. Industrial Mechanics (3)


    A study of mechanical systems used in industry such as couplings, bearings, and lubricants.
  
  •  

    TY 221. AC/DC Theory I (3)


    Instruction in basic electrical/electronic principles related to AC/DC theory and methods of applying this knowledge to various circuits as used by industry.  Includes introduction to discrete semi-conductors, amplifiers, power supplies and digital electronics.
  
  •  

    TY 222. Solid State Electronics (3)


    The course introduces the semiconductor fundamentals and applications to the electronic devices. Topics include number systems, medium scale integrated (MSI) and large scale integrated (LSI) circuits, Analog-to-Digital (A/D) and Digital-to-Analog (D/A) converters. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    TY 230. Basic Blueprint Reading and CAD (3)


    The application of basic blueprint reading, drafting, and computer-aided drafting techniques and procedures.
  
  •  

    TY 240. Fluid Power (3)


    Basic laws, principles, and components found in a fluid power system used in industry.
  
  •  

    TY 250. Workplace Safety and Health (3)


    Safety, hazard and catastrophe control, environmental concerns, laws, personal safety and health, workforce safety training and development.
  
  •  

    TY 260. Instrumentation, Precision and Equipment Calibration (3)


    The emphasis will be on methods of measurements of stress, temperature, pressure, force, torque, and calibration. Students will learn the basics of electronics as applied to instrumentation and analysis of automatic control systems. The types of instruments covered include those that read and record voltage, current, resistance and power; sensors for pressure, heat, strain, torque, fluid flow, and vibration measurement. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in TY 221 .
  
  •  

    TY 271. Electrical Motor Controls (3)


    A study of theory and operation of electric motor controllers as used by industry. Prerequisites: TY 221.
  
  •  

    TY 272. Electromechanical Controls (3)


    Provides an understanding of basic and advanced electrical controls used to operate industrial control systems and processes. Prerequisites: TY 271 .
  
  •  

    TY 281. Programmable Logic Controls I (3)


    The structure of PLC’s, operational principles, capabilities, limitations, input/output devices, symbols, and functions including principles and operating characteristics of various instruments and process controls used by industry. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in TY 221 .
  
  •  

    TY 282. Programmable Logic Controls II (3)


    Advance instruction in PLC’s that includes programming logic functions, data handling, PLC networks and troubleshooting and servicing PLC systems. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    TY 300. Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering Technology (3)


    The study of basic mechanical engineering, including applied mechanics, thermodynamics, machine design, and power generation.
  
  •  

    TY 320. Applied Statics (3)


    Students learn to calculate forces using the concept of equilibrium and free body diagrams and to calculate simple stresses and deflections. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, stress, strain and deflection. Prerequisites: MH 121 .
  
  •  

    TY 322. Fundamentals of Production Planning and Control (3)


    A concise, practical, survey approach to the fundamental principles of planning and control. Establish authority on supply chain management and production and inventory control including: forecasting, sales and operation planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirements planning, capacity management, and production activity control. Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
  •  

    TY 330. Applied Strength of Material (3)


    The relationship between forces applied to bodies and the resulting stresses and deformations. Strength, stress, elasticity, and stability are applied to Mechanical components. Prerequisites: MH 121  and TY 320 .
  
  •  

    TY 334. Computer-Aided Drafting/Design I (3)


    The generation of 2D graphic designs with computers as well as computer terminology, components, applications, and functions. Prerequisites: TY 230  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    TY 335. Computer-Aided Drafting/Design II (3)


    Students will learn advanced features and generate 3D graphic designs through computer application. Prerequisites: TY 334 .
  
  •  

    TY 338. Geospatial Information Systems (3)


    Includes the concepts of geographical mapping, database construction, database linkage, querying, and relational interface systems. Prerequisites: TY 334 .
  
  •  

    TY 339. Geospatial Information Systems II (3)


    This course will build on topics previously covered in the GIS I course. Students will develop skills necessary to build and complete a GIS project. Students will also learn how to use a global positioning system (GPS) and integrate data collected from the GPS into assigned projects. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    TY 351. Advanced Occupational Safety and Health (3)


    Safety, hazard and catastrophe control, environmental concerns, laws, costs, administration, management, liability, accident-loss prevention, and psychological considerations. Research is required on a specific topic determined by consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in BQ 271 .
  
  •  

    TY 352. Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (3)


    Study of health hazards, and/ or safety hazards. Includes investigation and remediation of hazardous waste sites and response to accidents of release of hazardous materials with compliance to federal certification guidelines. Prerequisites: TY 250  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    TY 383. Microprocessors/Microcontroller Programming (3)


    Introduction to programmable interface controllers (PIC) used in PLCs including internal operation, input/ output operation, programming languages, and common components. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in TY 221  and CS 300  ( CS 300  for CIS majors).
  
  •  

    TY 407. Independent Study in Technology (1-3)


    This course offers qualified students the opportunity for independent study in the area of technology. The individual needs and interests of the student determine the specific nature and content of the course. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Fifteen semester hours in Technology and permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    TY 408. Selected Topics in Technology (1-3)


    Offers qualified students the opportunity for study in areas not generally included in course offering. Specific content and nature determined by the interests and needs of the students. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    TY 420. Applied Heat Transfer (3)


    Fundamentals of heat transfer commonly found in many processes and products. The physical concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer are covered with emphasis on problem solving and practical application. Prerequisites: MH 121  and TY 320  .
  
  •  

    TY 438. Geospatial Information Systems III (3)


    This project-based course will utilize skills previously acquired in the GIS I and GIS II courses. Students will build a GIS project(s) and use the geocoding process in ArcGIS from data collected in the field with global positioning systems (GPS). Prerequisites: TY 339 .
  
  •  

    TY 440. Applied Dynamics (3)


    The dynamic analysis of particles and rigid bodies are performed using the three fundamental analytical methods. These include Force-Acceleration, Work-Energy, and Impulse-Momentum methods. This course covers kinematics, kinetics, work-energy, impulse- momentum, and mechanisms. Prerequisites: MH 121  and TY 320 .
  
  •  

    TY 453. Statistical Quality Control (3)


    Various quality systems such as Total Quality Management (TQM), ISO 9000 and 14000, Just-in-Time (JIT), Quality Function business, manufacturing, and service organizations. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in BQ 271 .
  
  •  

    TY 460. Technology Internship (3)


    A work-related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization that provides an opportunity for the application of terminology, theories, and concepts of technology. Open only to technology majors. Prerequisites: Senior status. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s Office.
  
  •  

    TY 490. Engineering Technology Project Survey (1)


    Student will research, develop and present to faculty a capstone project in Engineering Technology. Prerequisites: senior status.
  
  •  

    TY 491. Engineering Technology Project (2)


    Student will complete Engineering Technology capstone project and present to faculty. Prerequisites: senior status.

THEATRE (TH)

  
  •  

    TH 100. Introduction to Theatre (3)


    How theatre functions as a synthesis of related arts and a history of its development.
  
  •  

    TH 109. Dramatics Laboratory (1)


    Active participation in current UWA Theatre production, either as an actor or technician. May be repeated for maximum of six semester hours.
  
  •  

    TH 211. Acting I (3)


    An introduction to the techniques of acting, focusing on basic script analysis, scene study, and improvisation.
  
  •  

    TH 220. Stagecraft (3)


    An experiential learning course that focuses on the basic techniques of carpentry, lighting, sound, scenic painting, and backstage safety procedures.
  
  •  

    TH 311. Acting II (3)


    Advanced studies in acting, focusing on the classics and the unique demands for developing effective performances. Prerequisites: TH 211 .
  
  •  

    TH 312. Theatre Movement (3)


    Performance course designed to cover various disciplines of basic stage movement, physical alignment, body awareness, economy of movement and physical expression of character and storytelling.
  
  •  

    TH 313. Theatre Voice (3)


    Performance course design to explore various techniques in vocal production and control for the purpose of expressive and healthy performance.
  
  •  

    TH 341. Theatre History I (3)


    Study of theatre history and theory until 1900. Prerequisites: TH 100 .
  
  •  

    TH 342. Theatre History II (3)


    Study of theatre history and theory from 1901 to present. Prerequisites: TH 100 .
  
  •  

    TH 397. Independent Study in Theatre (1-3)


    Independent study in an area of theatre selected by the student. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    TH 439. Directing Practicum (1)


    Direct a one-act play. Prerequisite or corequisite: TH 480 .
  
  •  

    TH 480. Directing (3)


    Script selection and analysis for the director/designer, basic directing technique and design execution. Prerequisites: TH 100  or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    TH 498. Selected Topics in Theatre (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, discussions, and/or internship activities related to topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chairperson.

UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE (UWA)

  
  •  

    UWA 101. Freshman Seminar (2)


    Designed to help the new student develop essential survival skills and adapt to university-level studies and the unique environment of the campus community. Includes two regularly scheduled class periods per week, and several required out-of-class activities. Course required of all entering freshmen and of transfer students with fewer than twenty semester hours.
  
  •  

    UWA 102. Career Exploration (2)


    Group and individual activities to help students make career decisions, evaluate educational and employment opportunities, investigate major areas of study, and develop an understanding of the requirements for entering and advancing in a selected career field. Course designed for freshmen and sophomores.
  
  •  

    UWA 103. Career Explorations in Education (1)


    An investigation of programs available in the College of Education and requirements for each program.  Observation in classrooms and participation in professional learning communities required. Submission of fingerprints required through Cogent.


VARSITY ATHLETICS (VA)

These courses are only available to students on the Squad List for NCAA sports or active participants for non-NCAA sports. A maximum of four-semester hours may be earned through these courses, which are offered on a pass/fail basis. A student may receive credit for only one varsity athletic course per semester. These courses may not be used to fulfill physical education requirements in general education, in the major, or in the minor.

  
  •  

    VA 200. Varsity Baseball (1)


  
  •  

    VA 201. Varsity Basketball for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 202. Varsity Basketball for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 203. Varsity Cross Country for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 204. Varsity Cross Country for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 205. Varsity Football (1)


  
  •  

    VA 206. Varsity Softball (1)


  
  •  

    VA 207. Varsity Volleyball (1)


  
  •  

    VA 208. Varsity Cheerleading (1)


  
  •  

    VA 209. Varsity Rodeo (1)


  
  •  

    VA 210. Varsity Dance Line (1)


  
  •  

    VA 211. Varsity Tennis for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 212. Varsity Tennis for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 213. Varsity Soccer for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 214. Varsity Soccer for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 215. Varsity Golf for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 216. Varsity Golf for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 217. Varsity Track for Men (1)


  
  •  

    VA 218. Varsity Track for Women (1)


  
  •  

    VA 219. Varsity Triathlon for Women (1)



WELDING TECHNOLOGY (WT)

  
  •  

    WT 111. SMAW Fillet/OFC (3)


    Instruction on safety practices and terminology in the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process. Emphasis is placed on safety, welding terminology, equipment identification, set-up and operation, and related information in the SMAW process. Also covers rules of basic safety and identification of shop equipment. Provides the skills and knowledge necessary for the safe operation of oxy-fuel cutting. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 112. SMAW Fillet/OFC Lab (3)


    Introduces the proper set-up and operation of the shielded metal arc welding equipment. Emphasis is placed on striking and controlling the arc, and proper fit up of fillet joints. Also provides instruction in the safe operation of oxy-fuel cutting. Upon completion, the student should be able to make fillet welds in all positions using electrodes in the F-3 groups in accordance with applicable welding code and be able to safely operate oxy-fuel equipment and perform those operations as per the applicable welding code. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 121. SMAW Fillet/PAC/CAC (3)


     

    Instruction on safety practices and terminology in the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process. Emphasis is placed on safety, welding terminology, equipment identification, set-up and operation, and related information in the SMAW process. Also covers the rules of basic safety and identification of shop equipment. Provides the skills and knowledge necessary for the safe operation of carbon arc cutting and plasma arc cutting. Corequisites:

     .

  
  •  

    WT 122. SMAW Fillet/PAC/CAC Lab (3)


    Introduction to the proper set-up and operation of the shielded metal arc welding equipment. Emphasis is placed on striking and controlling the arc, and proper fit up of fillet joints. Also provides instruction in the safe operation of plasma arc and carbon arc cutting. Upon completion, students should be able to make fillet welds in all positions using electrodes in the F-4 groups in accordance with applicable welding code and be able to safely operate plasma arc and carbon arc equipment and perform those operations as per applicable welding code. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 131. Gas Metal Arc/Flux Cored Arc Welding (3)


    Introduces the student to gas metal arc and flux cored arc welding process. Emphasis is placed on safe operating practices, handling and storage of compressed gasses, process principles, component identification, various welding techniques and base and filler metal identification. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 132. Gas Metal Arc/Flux Cored Arc Welding Lab (3)


    Instruction and demonstration using the various transfer methods and techniques to gas metal arc and flux cored arc welds. Topics include safety, equipment set-up, joint design and preparation, and gases. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 141. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Groove Theory (3)


    Instruction on joint design, joint preparation, and fit-up of groove welds in accordance with applicable welding codes. Emphasis is placed on safe operation, joint design, joint preparation, and fit-up. Upon completion, the student should be able to identify the proper joint design, joint preparation and fit-up of groove welds in accordance with applicable welding codes. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 142. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Groove Lab (3)


    Instruction and demonstrations in the shielded metal arc welding process on carbon steel plate with various size F3 and F4 group electrodes in all positions. Emphasis is placed on welding groove joints and using various F3 and F4 group electrodes in all positions. Upon completion, the student should be able to make visually acceptable groove weld joints in accordance with applicable welding codes. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    WT 150. Welding Fundamentals (3)


    Basic hands-on techniques in Oxy-Fuel Cutting, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG), and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG).
 

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