2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 06, 2019  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

ACCOUNTING (AC)

  
  •  

    AC 211. Accounting I (3)


    Introduction to the field of accounting, including the accounting equation and the income statement with an emphasis on period ending adjustments. Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
  •  

    AC 212. Accounting II (3)


    Continued study of accounting concepts with emphasis on the liability and equity side of the balance sheet. Includes a study of partnerships, corporations, cash flows and financial statement analysis and an introduction to the study of management accounting concepts and processes. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 211 .
  
  •  

    AC 300. Survey of Accounting (3)


    Survey of financial and managerial concepts helpful in understanding business concepts and practices. Covers financial statements for merchandising, manufacturing and service companies. Topics include: accounting cycle, financial statement analysis, budgeting, standard costing, contribution margins, cost-volume-profit analysis, and decision making. This course may not be used to fulfill requirements in the Business Administration programs. A student who has received credit for AC 211  and AC 212  is not eligible to enroll in AC 300. Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
  •  

    AC 311. Intermediate Accounting I (3)


    Comprehensive review of the accounting cycle, financial statements, revenue recognition and current assets. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 212 .
  
  •  

    AC 312. Intermediate Accounting II (3)


    Continuation of AC 311  with a comprehensive review of non-current assets, debt and equity financing, other activities and earnings per share calculations. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 311 .
  
  •  

    AC 315. Computer Based Accounting Systems (3)


    Study of computer-based accounting and utilization of technology in accounting information systems. Includes Excel, Peachtree, and other specialized software. Topics include flowcharting, strengthening internal controls, and processing financial information. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 311 .
  
  •  

    AC 320. Managerial Accounting (3)


    In-depth study of interpretation and application of accounting data by management in planning and controlling business activities. Topics include financial statement analysis, price level changes, cost controls, budgeting and quantitative accounting techniques for management decision making. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major in accounting. Prerequisites: AC 212 .
  
  •  

    AC 321. Cost Accounting (3)


    Basic principles of cost accounting as applicable to job order and process cost accounting systems, emphasizing managerial aspects. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 212 .
  
  •  

    AC 322. Advanced Cost Accounting (3)


    Development of accounting information for decision making. Budget preparation, standard costs, cost-volume-profit analysis and applied cost determination procedures. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 321 .
  
  •  

    AC 331. Federal Income Tax I (3)


    Comprehensive study of the federal income taxation of individuals. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 212 .
  
  •  

    AC 332. Federal Income Tax II (3)


    Study of the federal income taxation of partnerships, corporations and fiduciaries. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 331 .
  
  •  

    AC 333. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Practicum (3)


    Accounting majors combine academic study with service to the community by electronically filing income tax returns free for qualified individuals. Enhances the student’s tax knowledge, client interaction and computer skills. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    AC 407. Independent Study in Accounting (1-3)


    Independent study in accounting. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the students. Required research paper and projects. Maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    AC 408. Selected Topics in Accounting (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Content determined by student interest and need. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    AC 411. Advanced Accounting I (3)


    Introduction to business combinations, consolidated financial statements at the date of acquisition and subsequent to acquisition, intercompany transactions and other special issues relating to consolidations, multinational accounting, and partnerships. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 312 .
  
  •  

    AC 412. Advanced Accounting II (3)


    A continuation of AC 411. Includes special reporting concerns relating to interim reporting and segmental data and the Securities and Exchange Commission, partnerships, government and not-for-profit accounting and fiduciary accounting. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 411 .
  
  •  

    AC 440. Governmental Accounting (3)


    Accounting theory and practice as applied to governmental divisions with emphasis on classification of accounts, fund accounting, statements and reports. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 312 .
  
  •  

    AC 451. Auditing I (3)


    Auditing theory and practice, professional ethics, working papers, financial statements and report writing. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 312  and AC 321 .
  
  •  

    AC 452. Auditing II (3)


    A continuation of AC 451 . Includes auditing theory and practice, professional ethics, working papers, financial statements and report writing. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in AC 451 .
  
  •  

    AC 460. Accounting/Finance Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of accounting/finance theories and concepts. Prerequisites: AC 312  and senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.
  
  •  

    AC 491. CPA Review: Auditing and Attestation (1)


    Intensive review of auditing topics related to planning and engagement responsibilities, risk assessment, internal control, evidence, and reports. Prerequisites: Completion of all required accounting major courses or approval of instructor.
  
  •  

    AC 492. CPA Review: Financial Accounting and Reporting (1)


    Intensive review of accounting topics related to financial statements, specialized topics, and governmental accounting. Prerequisites: Completion of all required accounting major courses or approval of instructor.
  
  •  

    AC 493. CPA Review: Regulation (1)


    Intensive review of topics related to ethics, business law topics, and federal taxation. Prerequisites: Completion of all required accounting major courses or approval of instructor.
  
  •  

    AC 494. CPA Review: Business Environment and Concepts (1)


    Intensive review of topics related to business structure, economics, finance, information technology, and cost accounting. Prerequisites: Completion of all required accounting major courses or approval of instructor.

AGRIBUSINESS (AB)

  
  •  

    AB 300. Introduction to Agribusiness Management (3)


    Application of management principles and processes to agricultural business firms in their planning and operating domestic and international markets.
  
  •  

    AB 301. Principles of Animal Science (3)


    Study of the major animal groups significant to the agricultural animal industry and the basic characteristics of each. Topics on animal health and nutrition, proper management as well as the history of the breeds will be covered.

AIR FORCE STUDIES (AFS)

 Courses offered at University of Alabama campus only

  
  •  

    AFS 101. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    A study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. Also studied are the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.
  
  •  

    AFS 102. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    A study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. Also studied are the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.
  
  •  

    AFS 110. Air Force Now (1)


    An introductory survey course that examines the history, organization, mission, and doctrine of the United States Air Force. Emphasis is placed on the study of U.S. strategic offensive and defensive forces, their organization, mission, and function. Effective written communication is stressed. One hour lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered fall semester only. Corequisites: AFS 101. Leadership Laboratory .
  
  •  

    AFS 120. Air Force Now (1)


    A survey course that examines U.S. general-purpose forces and aerospace support forces in terms of their organization, mission, and operation. Additionally, a study is made of the operations of tactical air forces, with emphasis on conventional and non-nuclear warfare. A review of Army, Navy, and Marine general-purpose forces is also included. Emphasis is placed on effective written communication. One hour lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered spring semester only. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    AFS 201. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    A study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. Also studied are the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.
  
  •  

    AFS 202. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    A study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, and military commands. Also studied are the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.
  
  •  

    AFS 230. Air Power Development (1)


    A study of the development of air power from balloons and dirigibles through the World War II era. The course includes technological impact on aviation, American attitudes toward aviation, development of doctrine and policy governing employment of air power, and growth of aviation through World War II. Emphasis is placed on effective oral communication. One hour lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered fall semester only. Corequisites:   
  
  •  

    AFS 240. Air Power Development (1)


    A study of air power from the Berlin Airlift through the contemporary environment. The course includes continued growth and use of air power during the Korean War, the Cuban missile crisis, and in Southeast Asia, and peaceful employment of the American air forces. Emphasis is placed on effective oral communication. One hour lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered spring semester only. Corequisites:    
  
  •  

    AFS 301. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    Include activities classified as leadership and management experiences. Also studied are the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Laboratory also includes interviews, guidance, and information which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
  
  •  

    AFS 302. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    Include activities classified as leadership and management experiences. Also studied are the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Laboratory also includes interviews, guidance, and information which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
  
  •  

    AFS 350. Leadership and Management (3)


    A study of management fundamentals and communication skills with concentration on Air Force applications. Individual motivational and behavioral processes and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for development of the junior officer’s managerial skills. Air Force staffing, counseling, and career management are also addressed. Emphasis is placed on the development of effective oral and written communication. Speaking and writing proficiency are required for a passing grade in this course. Three hours lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: Completion of four- or six-week field training courses or approval of the professor of air force studies. Corequisites:    
  
  •  

    AFS 360. Leadership and Management (3)


    A study of leadership and quality management, and their relationship in the dynamic environment of the Air Force officer. Management systems, leadership theory, and the decision-making process are the primary areas of emphasis in this course. Potential for conflict arising from political, organizational, and personal influences are also addressed. Speaking and writing proficiency are required for a passing grade in this course. Three hours lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisites:     Corequisites:    
  
  •  

    AFS 401. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    Include activities classified as leadership and management experiences. Also studied are the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Laboratory also includes interviews, guidance, and information which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
  
  •  

    AFS 402. Leadership Laboratory (1)


    Include activities classified as leadership and management experiences. Also studied are the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Laboratory also includes interviews, guidance, and information which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets.
  
  •  

    AFS 470. National Security Policy (3)


    A study of the evolution and structure of and processes involved in American national security policy formulation and implementation. The organization, function, and authority of the various governmental bodies with respect to national security decision making are covered. Historical and current involvement of the military with national security concerns is addressed. Regional studies include the CIS, the Middle East, and Latin America. Speaking and writing proficiency are required for a passing grade in this course. Three hours lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisites:    Corequisites: AFS 401. Leadership Laboratory.  
  
  •  

    AFS 480. National Security Policy (3)


    A study of international security issues and selected topics in military professionalism. Professional topics include military law, Air Force doctrine, and current issues and trends in the military profession. Speaking and writing proficiency are required for a passing grade in this course. Three hours lecture and a one and one-half hour lab per week. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: AFS 470. National Security Policy.    Corequisites: AFS 402. Leadership Laboratory.   

ANTHROPOLOGY (AN)

  
  •  

    AN 100. Introduction to Anthropology (3)


    An introduction to the study of human culture from an anthropological perspective. Contributions from the biological and historical sciences, as well as linguistics, are considered.
  
  •  

    AN 101. Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (3)


    An introduction to the biological and archaeological evidence for the origins and development of human biology and culture.
  
  •  

    AN 110. Introduction to Archaeology (3)


    An overview of archaeological methods and theories. Selected case studies are considered.
  
  •  

    AN 120. Great Discoveries in Archaeology (3)


    An illustrated overview of how archaeological investigations have molded, and continue to shape, knowledge of the human past.
  
  •  

    AN 200. Cultural Anthropology (3)


    An overview of the nature of culture and its role in human behavior. Prerequisites: AN 100  or permission of the department chairperson.
  
  •  

    AN 310. Indians of North America (3)


    A survey of the prehistory, history, and contemporary issues of native peoples in North America.
  
  •  

    AN 311. Indians of Latin America (3)


    A survey of the prehistory, history, and contemporary issues of native peoples in Latin America.
  
  •  

    AN 400. Archaeological Laboratory Methods (3)


    An introduction to the scientific and anthropological processing, analysis, and conservation of materials recovered from prehistoric and historic archaeological sites. Prerequisites: AN 100  or permission of the department chairperson.
  
  •  

    AN 401. Field Work in Archaeology I (4)


    Archaeological techniques of survey, excavation, and artifact processing are implemented at local sites. Prerequisites: AN 110  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 402. Field Work in Archaeology II (4)


    Archaeological techniques of survey, excavation, and artifact processing are implemented at local sites. Prerequisites: AN 100  and AN 401  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 407. Directed Study in Anthropology (3)


    Independent study for qualified undergraduates. Supervised research project required. Prerequisites: AN 100  and at least six hours of upper-level anthropology courses.
  
  •  

    AN 408. Cultural Resource Management (3)


    The practice of archaeology and historic preservation in the context of preservation law. Case studies will be used to examine the cultural resource management process, the resulting relationships between the public and government, and ethical issues. Prerequisites: AN 110  and HY 307 . 
  
  •  

    AN 409. Internship in Anthropology (3)


    Supervised internship with an approved museum, cultural resources management, or research facility. Prerequisites: nine hours of Anthropology courses, including AN 400 AN 401 , and AN 408 .
  
  •  

    AN 427. Indians of the Southeast (3)


    The prehistory and history of native cultures of Alabama and the Southeast, with an emphasis on archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric sources.
  
  •  

    AN 485. Fundamentals of Historical Archaeology (3)


    Explores archaeologists’ use of documentary evidence, oral history, and artifacts in interpreting social development in eastern North America from 1500 AD to 1900 AD. Prerequisites: AN 100 .
  
  •  

    AN 498. Selected Topics in Anthropology (3)


    Readings, lectures, and activities on selected anthropological topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by students’ interests and instructor’s expertise. Course may be taken twice for credit but only when content varies and for not more than six hours. Prerequisites: AN 100 .

ART (AT)

  
  •  

    AT 100. Introduction to Art (3)


    Study of significant works of art throughout history to heighten perception and enjoyment of the visual arts. Consideration of formal elements of artistic production in works representative of a broad range of styles, forms, and periods.
  
  •  

    AT 230. Basic Design (3)


    A study of the formal qualities of art stressing creative work using the principles of design, the aims of organization, and plastic elements of color, line, texture, space, and form in a variety of media.
  
  •  

    AT 301. Survey of Art History I (3)


    An introduction to the history of the visual expression of ideas from pre-history through the High Renaissance.
  
  •  

    AT 302. Survey of Art History II (3)


    Explores the history of visual ideas from the end of the Renaissance to the modern period.
  
  •  

    AT 311. Drawing I (3)


    A basic drawing course. Beginning to advanced studies from life. Emphasis on observation and accurate spatial and proportionate rendering through line and value studies. Introduction to composition and creative approaches to personal expression. Four hours weekly.
  
  •  

    AT 312. Drawing II (3)


    Continued studio experience in drawing with emphasis on advanced media and personal expression. Introduction to figure drawing. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 311 .
  
  •  

    AT 321. Painting I (3)


    A beginning painting course. Emphasis on color theory, technique, and historical approaches to painting. Four hours weekly.
  
  •  

    AT 322. Painting II (3)


    An intermediate painting course. Advanced studies in formal painting techniques with an emphasis on creative approaches to personal expression. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 321 .
  
  •  

    AT 341. Ceramics Studio I (3)


    A beginning ceramics course. Students will be introduced to a variety of traditional and nontraditional building techniques. Students will incorporate these techniques in both sculptural and functional forms. Basic glazing techniques will also be covered. Four hours weekly.
  
  •  

    AT 342. Ceramics Studio II (3)


    A continuation of AT 341 . Advanced techniques of the ceramicist. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 341 .
  
  •  

    AT 413. Drawing III (3)


    Provides the advanced student with further experience in drawing and requires experimentation, originality, and research. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 312 .
  
  •  

    AT 414. Drawing IV (3)


    Provides the advanced student with further experience in drawing and requires experimentation, originality, and research. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 413 .
  
  •  

    AT 423. Painting III (3)


    An advanced painting course. Offers the student instruction in individual painting interests with emphasis on media and personal expression. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 322 .
  
  •  

    AT 424. Painting IV (3)


    Provides the advanced student with further experience in painting and requires experimentation, originality, and research. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 423 .
  
  •  

    AT 443. Ceramics Studio III (3)


    An advanced ceramics course. Offers the student instruction in individual ceramic interests with emphasis on advanced techniques and personal expression. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 342 .
  
  •  

    AT 444. Ceramics Studio IV (3)


    An advanced ceramics course. Offers the student further instruction in individual ceramic interests with emphasis on advanced techniques and personal expression. Four hours weekly. Prerequisites: AT 443 .
  
  •  

    AT 497. Independent Study in Art (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study, with content and nature determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. A maximum of six semester hours credit is allowed in these courses. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    AT 498. Special Topics in Art (3)


    Readings, lectures, discussions, and/or studio art activities related to topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chairperson.

ATHLETIC TRAINING (AH)

  
  •  

    AH 101. Practicum in Athletic Training I (1)


    Opportunities for observing and gaining practical experience in the prevention, evaluation, treatment, management, and rehabilitation of injuries/illnesses. Sixty hours clinical experience.
  
  •  

    AH 102. Practicum in Athletic Training II (1)


    Provides majors opportunities to gain practical experience in the prevention, evaluation, treatment, management, and rehabilitation of injuries/illnesses. Sixty hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: AH 101 .
  
  •  

    AH 200. Introduction to Athletic Training (3)


    Overview of athletic training profession with emphasis on the basic fundamentals utilized by the athletic trainer in prevention, recognition, care, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries.
  
  •  

    AH 210. Protective Techniques for Injuries (2)


    Taping and wrapping techniques used in athletic training including instruction in fabricating and applying protective equipment, pads, splints, and supports. Hands-on practical experience emphasized in laboratory sessions. Project required.
  
  •  

    AH 220. Injury/Illness Assessment (2)


    General injury/illness assessment techniques with emphasis placed on the specifics of the assessment process including the history, observation, palpation, and physical examination.  Includes weekly laboratory. Prerequisites: AH 200  AH 200 , BY 231 .
  
  •  

    AH 230. Athletic Training Emergency Care (2)


    Addresses the components and implementation of emergency action plans and critical aspects of a primary survey beyond that of a CPR/FA Certified Professional Rescuer.  Management techniques in critical care that challenges students with critical thinking and real life scenarios to further their knowledge and ability. Prerequisites:  , American National Red Cross Professional Rescuer/AED First Aid and CPR or American Heart Association BLS for Health Care Providers certification or Emergency Medical Technician equivalency.
  
  •  

    AH 280. Athletic Training Clinical Education (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. One hundred twenty five hours clinical experience. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: admission to athletic training program and approval of Athletic Training Program Director.
  
  •  

    AH 281. Athletic Training Clinical Education I (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. One hundred twenty five hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 282. Athletic Training Clinical Education II (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. One hundred twenty five hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 300. General Medical Aspects of Athletic Training (3)


    Non-orthopedic general medical conditions, pharmacology, and psychology in sports medicine. Prerequisites: AH 200 , BY 231 , PE 251 .
  
  •  

    AH 301. Research in Athletic Training (1)


    Development of an application of research techniques in evidence based practice.  Prepare students to find and use evidence based practice, and to allow the ability to create a research paper.     or higher, and junior standing.
  
  •  

    AH 321. Injury/Illness Assessment Laboratory (1)


    Assigned specific laboratory experiences in injury/illness assessment. Must be taken concurrently with AH 220  and serves as its laboratory. Corequisites: AH 220 .
  
  •  

    AH 322. Evaluation of Injuries I (3)


    Evaluation of specific injuries to the lumbar spine and lower extremities and related anatomy, etiology, signs, and symptoms. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    AH 323. Evaluation of Injuries I Laboratory (1)


    Assigned specific laboratory experiences in evaluation of lumbar spine and lower extremity injuries. Must be taken concurrently with AH 324  and serves as its laboratory. Corequisites: AH 322 .
  
  •  

    AH 324. Evaluation of Injuries II (3)


    Evaluation of specific injuries to the head, cervical spine, trunk, and upper extremities and related anatomy, etiology, signs, and symptoms. Prerequisites: AH 322 .
  
  •  

    AH 325. Evaluation of Injuries II Laboratory (1)


    Assigned specific laboratory experiences in evaluation of head, cervical spine, trunk, and upper extremity injuries. Must be taken concurrently with AH 324  and serves as its laboratory. Corequisites: AH 324 .
  
  •  

    AH 330. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training (3)


    Techniques, indications, and procedures in application of therapeutic modalities including thermotherapy, cryotherapy, light, sound, electricity, compression, traction, and massage. Prerequisites: AH 324  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AH 331. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training Laboratory (1)


    Assigned specific laboratory experiences in therapeutic modality application. Must be taken concurrently with AH 330  and serves as its laboratory. Corequisites: AH 330 .
  
  •  

    AH 340. Rehabilitation of Injuries (3)


    Equipment, techniques, and procedures for injury rehabilitation. Strengthening, flexibility, muscular and cardiovascular endurance conditioning, and proprioceptive training. Prerequisites: AH 330 , PE 443 . Prerequisite or corequisite PE 444 .
  
  •  

    AH 341. Rehabilitation of Injuries Laboratory (1)


    Assigned specific laboratory experiences in rehabilitation of injuries. Must be taken concurrently with AH 340  and serves as its laboratory. Corequisites: AH 340 .
  
  •  

    AH 350. Organization and Administration of Athletic Training (2)


    Organizational/administrative procedures and legal aspects of athletic training and sports medicine. Prerequisites: AH 200 .
  
  •  

    AH 381. Athletic Training Clinical Education III (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. One hundred eighty five hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 382. Athletic Training Clinical Education IV (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. One hundred eighty five hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 397. Independent Study in Athletic Training (1-3)


    Offers qualified undergraduate students an opportunity for independent study in athletic training. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student individual needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
 

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