2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Sep 22, 2020  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

ATHLETIC TRAINING (AH)

  
  •  

    AH 400. Clinical Decisions in Athletic Training (1)


    Provides majors with an opportunity for instruction, discussion and laboratory activities in clinical decision making related to prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation in patient care. Prerequisites: AH 340 .
  
  •  

    AH 402. Theory and Techniques of Athletic Training (3)


    Overview of athletic training techniques and the approaches utilized by the athletic trainer in prevention, recognition, care, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries. Includes taping, wrapping, protective equipment fabrication and application.
  
  •  

    AH 408. Seminar in Athletic Training (1)


    Provides student with information, practice exams, and counseling pertinent to professional careers in athletic training and sports medicine. Two lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of the athletic training program director.
  
  •  

    AH 409. Pre-professional Clinical Experience (1-4)


    Provides structured full-time field experience (60 clock hours per credit hour) related to one of the following employment areas in the professional of athletic training under the direct guidance of an NATABOC certified athletic trainer: sports medicine clinic, secondary school, industrial/corporate, collegiate, and professional sports. May be repeated for a maximum of four semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of athletic training and approval of athletic training program director.
  
  •  

    AH 430 - DUPLICATE. Therapeutic Modalities and Lab (3)


    Techniques, indications, and procedures in application of therapeutic modalities including thermotherapy, cryotherapy, light, sound, electricity, compression, traction, and massage with specific laboratory experiences in therapeutic modality application.
  
  •  

    AH 432. Psychological Aspects of Athletic Training (2)


    Explore the psychological aspects of injury/illness experienced by the active population.  Review psychological dispositions and tendencies predisposing populations to injury/illness.  Recognition/assessment and management/treatment techniques to address injury/illness. Prerequisites:   and senior standing.
  
  •  

    AH 440. Therapeutic Exercise and Lab (3)


    Equipment, techniques, and procedures for injury rehabilitation. Strengthening, flexibility, muscular and cardiovascular endurance conditioning, and proprioceptive training with specific laboratory experiences in rehabilitation of injuries.
  
  •  

    AH 481. Athletic Training Clinical Education V (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Two hundred fifty hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 482. Athletic Training Clinical Education VI (1)


    Designed to evaluate specific clinical proficiencies, introduced the previous semesters, which have been established by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Two hundred fifty hours clinical experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the athletic training program.
  
  •  

    AH 489. Athletic Training Internship (6-12)


    Multiple week field experience under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer in an approved school, university, clinical, corporate, public, private, commercial, performing arts, or military setting related to athletic training. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: At least thirty hours in athletic training major.
  
  •  

    AH 498. Selected Topics in Athletic Training (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussions, and laboratory experiences in athletic training not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN (AU)

  
  •  

    AU 101. Fundamentals of Automotive Technology (3)


    This course provides basic instruction in fundamentals of automotive technology.
  
  •  

    AU 112. Electrical Fundamentals (3)


    This course introduces the principles and laws of electricity. Emphasis is placed on wiring diagrams, test equipment, and identifying series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. Upon completion, students should be able to calculate, build, and measure circuits.
  
  •  

    AU 124. Automotive Engines (3)


    This course provides instruction on the operation, design, and superficial repair of automotive engines. Emphasis is placed on understanding the four stroke cycle, intake and exhaust manifolds and related parts, engine mechanical timing components, engine cooling and lubrication system principles and repairs, and basic fuel and ignition operation.
  
  •  

    AU 127. Automotive Braking and Steering / Steering and Suspension Systems (3)


    This course provides instruction in automotive technology or auto mechanics. Emphasis is placed on the practical application maintenance and repair of brakes, steering, and suspensions systems.
  
  •  

    AU 130. Drive Trains and Axles (3)


    This course provides basic instruction in automotive drive trains and axles. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and application of basic internal and external operation relating to proper operation and drivability.
  
  •  

    AU 133. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (3)


    This course provides basic instruction in theory, operation, and repair of automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and repair of vehicle air conditioning and heating systems, including but not limited to air management, electrical and vacuum controls, refrigerant recovery, and component replacement.
  
  •  

    AU 162. Electrical Electronic Systems (3)


    This is an intermediate course in automotive electrical and electronic systems.  Emphasis is placed on troubleshotting and repair of battery, starting, charging, and lighting systems, subsystems, and components.
  
  •  

    AU 212. Advanced Electrical / Electronic Systems (3)


    This course provides instruction in advanced automotive electrical and electronic systems. Emphasis is placed on troubleshooting and repair of advanced electrical and electronic systems, subsystems, and components.
  
  •  

    AU 231. Engine Repair (3)


    This course provides instruction on the operation, design, and superficial repair of automotive engines. Emphasis is placed on understanding the four stroke cycle, intake and exhaust manifolds and related parts, engine mechanical timing components, engine cooling and lubrication system principles and repairs, and basic fuel and ignition operation.
  
  •  

    AU 235. Transmissions and Transaxles (3)


    This course covers basic instruction in manual and automatic transmissions and transaxles. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and application of basic internal and external operation relating to proper operation and drivability. Instruction includes the principles and power-flow of automatic transmissions and repairing or replacing internal and external components.
  
  •  

    AU 239. Engine Performance (3)


    This course provides basic instruction in engine performance with emphasis on fuel and ignition systems relating to engine operation.
  
  •  

    AU 248. Engine Performance, Diagnostics, and Emissions (3)


    This course provides advanced instruction on engine performance to include engine management, computer controls of ignition, fuel, and emission systems relating to engine performance and drivability. Instruction includes troubleshooting and repair of systems, subsystems, and components.
  
  •  

    AU 291. Work-Based Learning (1-3)


    These courses constitute a series wherein the student works on a part-time basis in a job directly related to automotive mechanics. In these courses the employer evaluates the student’s productivity and the student submits a descriptive report of his work experiences. Upon completion, the student will demonstrate skills learned in an employment setting.  One to three semester hours per semester.  May be repeated for a maximum of three semseter hours credit.
  
  •  

    AU 293. Work-Based Learning (1-3)


    These courses constitute a series wherein the student works on a part-time basis in a job directly related to automotive mechanics. In these courses the employer evaluates the student’s productivity and the student submits a descriptive report of his work experiences. Upon completion, the student will demonstrate skills learned in an employment setting.  One to three semester hour per semester.  May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit.

BIOLOGY (BY)

  
  •  

    BY 101. Introductory Biology I (4)


    Fundamental biology and chemistry of the cell, including structure, function, replication, metabolism, and genetics, with emphasis on contemporary examples that relate to humans. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 102. Introductory Biology II (4)


    Evolution, diversity, and ecology of plants and animals. This course may not be used to satisfy the requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 103. Honors Biology (4)


    Designed for students participating in the Honors Program. The following topics are covered, with an emphasis upon contemporary problems in each unit: chemical and structural bases of life, genetics, reproduction and development. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: ACT composite score of 22 or higher and an ACT science reasoning score of 24 or higher.
  
  •  

    BY 104. Principles of Biology (4)


    A comprehensive study of the chemical aspects of living systems, cellular structure, function and replication, metabolism, and genetics. This course is designed for biology and other science majors and minors. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 111. Basic Greenhouse Practices (1-3)


    Students work in a greenhouse situation and pursue individualized projects dealing with the identification, care, and propagation of ornamental plants. Special project and readings are required. May not be counted toward the requirements for a major or minor in biology. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 204. Medical Ethics (3)


    An introduction to medical ethics in which basic ethical systems and principles of ethical reasoning will be explored in the context of medical situations.
  
  •  

    BY 212. General Botany (4)


    Survey of selected monerans, protistans, and plants, with emphasis on processes, structure, selected life histories, ecology, and the importance of each group to humans. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 103  or BY 104 .
  
  •  

    BY 222. General Zoology (4)


    Survey of major taxa of the animal kingdom and introduction to animal anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:   or BY 103 .
  
  •  

    BY 231. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)


    Gross and microscopic anatomy and functions of the integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and muscular systems of the human body. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 101  or BY 103  or BY 104 .
  
  •  

    BY 232. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)


    Gross and microscopic anatomy and functions of the circulatory, urinary, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 231 .
  
  •  

    BY 233. Applied Nutrition (3)


    Metabolic functions of essential nutrients and their relation to the growth and maintenance of the body. Nutritional requirements of different age levels and dietary assessment. Clinical application of diet therapy is emphasized. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 232 .
  
  •  

    BY 234. Medical Terminology (3)


    Medical vocabulary, spelling, pronunciation, and word-building using prefixes, root words, and suffixes. Designed primarily for students in allied health and pre-professional areas of medicine. Three lecture per week. Prerequisites: BY 231  and BY 232 .
  
  •  

    BY 240. Applied Microbiology (4)


    Biology of microorganisms with emphasis on their relation to other organisms and to the health of humans. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    BY 289. Laboratory Practicum (1)


    Provides an introduction to the planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory and/or field activities. Emphasis on use of laboratory equipment, safety regulations, hazardous waste disposal and teaching resources. Two contact hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 307. Independent Study in Biology (1-8)


    Independent study in the biological sciences. Content and nature of the courses are determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 308. Seminar in Biology (1)


    Use of the library and methods of literature search including computer access of literature databases. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: BY 212  or BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 309. Biological Science Internship (1-4)


    Open only to majors in biology. The student, working with an assigned biology faculty member, applies for an internship at an approved site. The internship must be approved by the Dean. The student provides a written report at the end of the internship to the assigned biology faculty member. This report, with an evaluation by the intern director at the site, is the basis on which a letter grade is assigned. This course may be repeated for a maximum of four semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology.
  
  •  

    BY 314. Trees and Shrubs of Alabama (4)


    Woody plants in natural environments, with emphasis on identification, taxonomy, and economic importance of trees and shrubs of the Southeastern U.S. Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
  •  

    BY 320. Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    Survey of invertebrate phyla, emphasizing morphology, physiology, and phylogenetic relationships. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 330. Hematology (4)


    Human blood cells, blood forming organs, and abnormalities involving these cells and/or organs. Cell morphology, methods of cell enumeration, and basic hematology testing are emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 331. Immunology (4)


    Host defense against infectious agents, emphasis on mechanisms of humoral immunity (antigens/antibodies), cellular immunity, and hypersensitivities. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 340. Microbiology (4)


    Concepts and techniques relating to the morphology, taxonomy, physiology, and culture methods of microbes, with emphasis on those of special importance to humans. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 103  or BY 104 .
  
  •  

    BY 367. Independent Study in Marine Biology (1-8)


    Independent study in marine biology and/or a related area of the marine sciences. Content and nature of the courses are determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 375. Molecular and Microbial Biology (3)


    Provide the venue for the investigation of biological and chemical diversity of microbes in soil and a platform from which to teach different biological concepts. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 103  or BY 104 .
  
  •  

    BY 380. Genetics (4)


    Basic principles of heredity and their significance. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 , BY 222 , and CH 111 .
  
  •  

    BY 389. Advanced Laboratory Practicum in Biology (1)


    This course will provide advanced training in the planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory and/or field activities in a specific area of biology. Emphasis is on techniques specific to a particular discipline within the field. Five contact hours per week. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Twenty semester hours in biology and permission of instructor and Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 392. History of Life on Earth (4)


    A survey of life and geological settings through time, including methods, principles of evolution and stratigraphy, practical experience with collecting and analyzing fossils, and cultural implications. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Eight hours of biology and GE 102 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    BY 393. Paleontology (4)


    Taxonomic principles; identification, characteristics, and evolution of the geologically important fossil groups; principles of biostratigraphy; and the cataloguing of fossils collected in the field. Includes several local and one day field trips. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology and permission of Dean. Corequisites: Recommended GE 102  or ES 100  as prerequisites or corequisites.
  
  •  

    BY 400. Senior Seminar (1)


    A capstone course in which students of biological sciences consolidate their academic experience and develop skills necessary to enter the work force or to further their education in graduate programs of biological or environmental sciences. This course will also be used to evaluate the efficacy to which departmental objectives are being accomplished. To be taken the penultimate semester of the degree program unless earlier permission is granted by the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    BY 404. Research Design and Data Analysis (3)


    A study of the planning, organizing, and implementing of scientific research experiments. Computer based data treatment, graphing, and analysis methods are covered in detail. Prerequisites: MH 114  and 20 hours in biology and/or environmental sciences
  
  •  

    BY 408. Selected Topics in Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as aquatic biology, biological illustrations, helminthology, histology, protozoology, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 410. Field Botany (4)


    Methods for the collection and identification of vascular plants in natural environments, including plant identification, taxonomy, systematics, collection, preservation, and ecological interactions. Includes one weekend field trip. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
  •  

    BY 413. Plant Biodiversity (4)


    Evolution, morphology, anatomy, reproduction, and classification of land plants (bryophytes, ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, flowering plants and fossil lineages). Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
  •  

    BY 414. Marine Botany (4)


    Structure, reproduction, identification, distribution, and ecology of marine and estuarine algae, vascular, and nonvascular plants. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory work per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 415. Economic Botany (3)


    The economic uses of plants from around the world with emphasis placed on particular plant species that are utilized for fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, beverages, oils, fibers, wood, resins, etc.  Also included is plant domestication, centers of origin, cultivation, harvest practices, parts used, and preparation.  Online only.

  
  •  

    BY 416. Endangered Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of the federally listed plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, distribution, pertinent environmental factors, and conservation efforts for each species. The legal process of how a species becomes federally listed is also considered.
  
  •  

    BY 417. Invasive Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of invasive plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, pertinent environmental factors, biological strategies and control efforts for each species. The overarching impact to the natural landscape and how they impact humans is also considered.
  
  •  

    BY 418. The Tombigbee River (4)


    A two-week ecological field study of the Tombigbee River basin. Participants travel the basin by land and water while camping. Topics covered will include the relevant geology, hydrology, ecology, economics, water quality, and history of the Tombigbee River basin.
  
  •  

    BY 420. Field Zoology (4)


    A detailed study of the fauna of western Alabama, including collection, identification, taxonomy, systematics, preservation, and ecological interactions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 421. Parasitology (4)


    Taxonomy, morphology, and host parasite relationships of the major parasites of humans and other selected animals. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    BY 424. Marine Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, ecology, physiology, and phylogenetic relationship of locally occurring marine invertebrate taxa. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . BY 320  highly recommended. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 425. Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, behavior, physiology, and ecology of marine vertebrates with emphasis on species of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 426. Coastal Ornithology (4)


    Distribution, population dynamics, food habits, habitat analysis, and field identification of coastal and pelagic birds in Alabama. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 427. Biology of Fishes (4)


    Survey of the fishes emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Prerequisites: twelve (12) semester hours of biology, including BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 427 - DUPLICATE. Marine Behavioral Ecology (4)


    Examines how animal behavior is influenced by and interacts with the environment, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of these behaviors in a marine setting. Prerequisites: BY 222  and MH 246 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 428. Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Survey of vertebrate classes emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology and ecology. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology, including BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 429. Entomology (4)


    Survey of the insects, emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
  •  

    BY 431. Histology (4)


    A study of the microscopic anatomy of tissue of vertebrates, particularly mammals. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 , BY 231 , BY 232  and an additional four hours of biology at 200 level or higher.
  
  •  

    BY 432. Human Embryology (3)


    Gametogenesis and development of humans. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites:  ;   recommended.
  
  •  

    BY 441. Environmental Toxicology (4)


    Overview of concepts and terminology combining several diverse disciplines to investigate how society creates, regulates, and perceives the effects of toxic substances in the environment. Health issues and approaches to control the major environmental health problems associated with various occupations in industrialized and developing countries will also be examined. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 450. Ecology (4)


    Relationship between individual organisms and their environment; the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems; and computer usage in data analysis and report writing. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and MH 246 .
  
  •  

    BY 451. Marine Ecology (4)


    Bioenergetics, community structure, population dynamics, predation, competition, and speciation in marine ecosystems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 112 , and PH 201 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 453. Appalachian Ecology (4)


    A study of the biodiversity and geology of the Appalachian Mountains with particular focus on unique biological communities and the impact of natural and anthropogenic events on the landscape and ecology. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 454. Conservation Biology (3)


    This course provides an introduction to the field of conservation biology. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 455. Ecological Management (3)


    Management methods and factors affecting successful management of natural resources, with a look at several specific habitat types.  Online only.
  
  •  

    BY 456. Ecological Restoration (3)


    Exploration of basic principles of ecological restoration including physical, chemical, and biological manipulations required for restoration success. Additionally, this course will provide a detailed examination of practical aspects of restoration in selected ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Twenty hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 457. Natural History of the Black Belt (3)


    The Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi is a unique and culturally significant region characterized by its geography, soils, prairies, and people. Experts in different fields survey the geography, history, archaeology, geologic history, paleontology, hydrology, biology, ecology, economics, and future of grassland, forest, aquatic, and urban environments of the Black Belt region. Three lecture hours per week and two Saturday field trips. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.
  
  •  

    BY 458. Subtropical Ecology (4)


    This course will provide an introduction to habitats and ecosystems of subtropical Florida. Students will gain insight into the natural and cultural history of some of the most unique and diverse habitats in North America. The course will include weekly meetings to discuss subtropical habitats, followed by a 7 day field trip. Upon return, students will develop a research paper and a presentation on a topic related to these habitats. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    BY 459. Alabama Natural Communities (4)


    This course provides an introduction to natural areas and biological communities of Alabama. Students will study and travel to many of Alabama’s diverse natural systems and examine the factors leading to the tremendous biodiversity of the state.
  
  •  

    BY 460. Oceanography (4)


    General introduction to the ocean with emphasis on geological, chemical, and physical processes and how they relate to biological systems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 112 , and PH 201 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 461. Aquatic Biology (4)


    Limnological principles, field techniques, and qualitative and quantitative study of aquatic ecosystems, especially freshwater systems in West Central Alabama. Research project and paper are required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 111 .
  
  •  

    BY 463. Marine Technical Methods (2)


    The hardware of marine science, sampling procedures, processing, station location, and field maintenance operation. Ten hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 . (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 464. Coastal Wetlands Ecology (4)


    Wetlands provide critical habitat for many aquatic and semi-aquatic species, improve water quality, and protect shorelines from floodwaters. This course focuses on coastal wetlands and emphasize biogeochemical processes, biodiversity and ecosystem function, as well as address the issues that threaten and protect these valuable resources. Prerequisites: BY 101 BY 212 , and BY 222 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 465. Ecology of the Florida Everglades (2)


    This two-week course examines the natural history and ecology of one of the world’s rarest and most endangered wilderness areas, the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. Lectures and discussions during the first week are followed by eight days of field exploration within the Everglades and associated systems in southern Florida. Special fees apply. Prerequisites: BY 101 . Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 468. Selected Topics in Marine Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as marine fisheries science, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.
  
  •  

    BY 471. Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of enzymes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Pre or Corequisite CH 242 .
  
  •  

    BY 472. Cell Biology (4)


    Cells and subcellular structures and such cellular processes as energy transformation, transport of materials, and growth. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , and CH 241 .
  
  •  

    BY 474. Human Physiology (4)


    This course is an in depth study of human medical physiology. Lab work will examine the underlying chemistry, physics, and biochemistry principles of body function. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BY 222  and sixteen hours of biology at 200 level or higher.
  
  •  

    BY 490. Evolutionary Theory (3)


    Advanced study of the modern synthesis of the theory of evolution by natural selection and Mendelian genetics. Prerequisites:   , and BY 242. Corequisites:  .
  
  •  

    BY 491. Biogeography (3)


    Distribution patterns of organisms and the historical and ecological factors contributing to those patterns. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Twenty hours in biology.
  
  •  

    BY 494. Genomics (4)


    A study of the molecular biology techniques used to investigate the structure, function and regulation of expression of genes.
  
  •  

    BY 495. Research in Biology (3)


    Research experience in the biological sciences in which the student learns to conduct research by engaging in an ongoing research project of the faculty in the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean and instructor.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA)

  
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    BA 100. ENACTUS (1)


    Active participation in multidisciplinary leadership experience with Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). Emphasizes ethical business practices, use of technology, and fair treatment of all members of society. May be repeated for a maximum of four credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    BA 263. Business Law and Legal Environment (3)


    Legal environment of business with respect to ethical, social and political influences. Legal principles applicable to business transactions. Contracts, torts, agency, employment law, and business organization
  
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    BA 330. Business Ethics (3)


    Social responsibility of business, including business ethics and business relationships with government, education, labor and the community. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300  and junior standing.
 

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