2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue 
    
    Jan 20, 2021  
2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 4


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Anthropology (AN)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
College Teaching (CT)
Community Counseling (CC)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
English (EH)
Environmental Science (EN)
Finance (FI)

History (HY)
Instructional Leadership (IL)
Journalism (JN)
Library Media (LM)
Management (MN)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Online Teaching (OT)
Physical Education (PE)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
School Counseling (SC)
Sociology (SY)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Student Affairs (SA)
Teacher Leader (TL)
Theatre (TH)

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at the University of West Alabama is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

The University of West Alabama uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

500-599 — courses for masters-level students
600-699 — courses for Education Specialist-level students

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

ACCOUNTING (AC)

  
  •  

    AC 510. Managerial Accounting (3)


    This course examines advanced topics in accounting and finance, including SEC reporting, corporations in financial difficulty, multinational accounting and additional consolidation reporting issues. Relevant examples of current events comprise the foundational cases for this course.

ANTHROPOLOGY (AN)

  
  •  

    AN 500. Archaeological Laboratory Methods (3)


    An introduction to the scientific and anthropological processing, analysis, and conservation of materials recovered from prehistoric and historic archaeological sites. Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    AN 501. Field Work in Archaeology I (4)


    Archaeological techniques of survey, excavation, and artifact processing are implemented at local sites. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 502. Field Work in Archaeology II (4)


    Archaeological techniques of survey, excavation, and artifact processing are implemented at local sites. Prerequisites: AN 501  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 585. Fundamentals of Historical Archaeology (3)


    Explores archaeologists’ use of documentary evidence, oral history, and artifacts interpreting social development in eastern North America from 1500 AD to 1900 AD.

ATHLETIC TRAINING (AH)

  
  •  

    AH 502. Non Orthopaedic Evaluation and General Medical Issues (3)


    Evaluation of specific injuries and medical conditions related anatomy, etiology, signs, and symptoms and specific laboratory experiences in assessment and diagnosis. Includes psychosocial aspects in patient care.
  
  •  

    AH 508. Athletic Training Capstone Project or Thesis (3)


    Students will select a topic of study in athletic training. Each student selects a faculty advisor to provide guidance in planning, coordinating, conducting and presenting the project or thesis. The capstone project can take several different forms including a literature review, a mentored research project with a faculty member, or a faculty approved project in athletic training. The thesis option requires a document evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials.
  
  •  

    AH 520. Pathophysiology of Musculoskeletal Injury (3)


    Etiology, progression, epidemiology of injury, illness & disease discussed with a clinical emphasis. Designed to provide knowledge and skills that relate to modification of physiological processes associated with musculoskeletal injury, pain & tissue repair for the purpose of restoring optimal musculoskeletal function.
  
  •  

    AH 522. Assessment of Lower Extremities and Lab (3)


    Evaluation of specific injuries to the lumbar spine and lower extremities with related anatomy, etiology, signs, and symptoms and specific laboratory experiences in assessment and diagnosis.
  
  •  

    AH 524. Assessment of Upper Extremities and Lab (3)


    Evaluation of specific injuries to the head, cervical spine, trunk, and upper extremities with related anatomy, etiology, signs, and symptoms and specific laboratory experiences in assessment and diagnosis.
  
  •  

    AH 542. Performance Enhancement through Nutrition and Physical Conditioning (3)


    Utilization of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, nutrition, and training techniques in designing strength, conditioning and dietary programs for athletes. Consideration will be given to strategies for improving sports-specific agility, coordination, speed, power, strength, and cardiovascular/respiratory fitness.
  
  •  

    AH 550. Professional Behaviors in Athletic Training (3)


    Course content will include basic legal and ethical terminology, areas of legal and ethical risks for the athletic trainer, measures to reduce those risks and appropriate professional behavior and leadership, management, and administrative styles. Course content will also include basic psychological theories and the psychological aspects of injury and illness and other current topics of concern in athletic training.
  
  •  

    AH 552. Athletic Training Administration (3)


    Addresses the organizational, administrative, and professional aspects of athletic training. Topics include: personnel concerns, facilities and equipment management, budgetary administration, electronic medical records, insurance issues, public relations, computer use, federal and state regulation, pre-participation physical evaluations, and drug testing.
  
  •  

    AH 581. Athletic Training Clinical I (1)


    Designed to provide clinical experience and allow for evaluation of specific clinical proficiencies. Eighty hours clinical experience.
  
  •  

    AH 582. Athletic Training Clinical II (1)


    Designed to provide clinical experience and allow for evaluation of specific clinical proficiencies. Two hundred fifty hours clinical experience.
  
  •  

    AH 583. Athletic Training Clinical III (1)


    Designed to provide clinical experience and allow for evaluation of specific clinical proficiencies. Two hundred fifty hours clinical experience.
  
  •  

    AH 584. Athletic Training Clinical/Practicum I (2)


    Designed to provide clinical experience and allow for evaluation of specific clinical proficiencies. Five hundred hours clinical experience.
  
  •  

    AH 585. Athletic Training Clinical/Practicum II (2)


    Designed to provide clinical experience and allow for evaluation of specific clinical proficiencies. Five hundred hours clinical experience.

BIOLOGY (BY)

  
  •  

    BY 500. Graduate Seminar (1)


    Students attend and participate in a one-hour weekly seminar and present a 45-minute seminar during the semester. Must be taken a minimum of three times.
  
  •  

    BY 502. The Biological Sciences for the Elementary Teacher (3)


    Methods in biological instruction and biological concepts including development of life, diversity of organisms, cell structure and physiology, reproduction, genetics, energy exchange, coordination and control, transportation of materials, and ecology. Research paper is required. Prerequisites: Twenty semester hours of biology.
  
  •  

    BY 503. The Biological Sciences for the Secondary Teacher (3)


    The nature of science and scientific research, materials and methods of instruction, recent trends in biological research and instruction, molecular biology and biochemistry, cellular physiology, genetics, reproduction and embryology, ecology, and bioethics. Research project is required. Prerequisites: Twenty semester hours of biology.
  
  •  

    BY 504. Research Design and Data Analysis (3)


    A study of the planning, organizing, and implementing of scientific research experiments. Computer based data treatment, graphing, and analysis methods are covered in detail. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Computer proficiency in Microsoft Excel and Word is critical.
  
  •  

    BY 505. History of Biology (3)


    A study of the origin and development of scientific thought pertaining to the field of biology. The work of key contributors will be examined with emphasis on social and political context. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 508. Teaching College Biology (3)


    The role of biology in the curriculum, types and levels of courses, and techniques of teaching. Development of teaching materials and teaching observation required.
  
  •  

    BY 510. Field Botany (4)


    Methods for the collection and identification of vascular plants in natural environments, including plant identification, taxonomy, systematics, collection, preservation, and ecological interactions. Includes one weekend field trip. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate student and permission of instructor and Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 513. Advanced Plant Biology (4)


    Evolution, morphology, anatomy, reproduction, and classification of land plants (bryophytes, ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, flowering plants and fossil lineages). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instruction and Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 514. Marine Botany (4)


    Structure, reproduction, identification, distribution, and ecology of marine and estuarine algae, vascular, and nonvascular plants. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 515. Economic Botany (3)


     

    The economic uses of plants from around the world with emphasis placed on particular plant species that are utilized for fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, beverages, oils, fibers, wood, resins, etc.  Also included is plant domestication, centers of origin, cultivation, harvest practices, parts used, and preparation.  Online only.

  
  •  

    BY 516. Endangered Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of the federally listed plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, distribution, pertinent environmental factors, and conservation efforts for each species. The legal process of how a species becomes federally listed is also considered.
  
  •  

    BY 517. Invasive Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of invasive plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, pertinent environmental factors, biological strategies and control efforts for each species. The overarching impact to the natural landscape and how they impact humans is also considered.
  
  •  

    BY 518. The Tombigbee River (4)


    A two-week ecological field study of the Tombigbee River basin. Participants travel the basin by land and water while camping. Topics covered will include the relevant geology, hydrology, ecology, economics, water quality, and history of the Tombigbee River basin.
  
  •  

    BY 520. Field Zoology (4)


    A detailed study of the fauna of western Alabama, including collection, identification, taxonomy, systematics, preservation, and ecological interactions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor and Dean. Undergraduate course in general zoology highly recommended.
  
  •  

    BY 522. Vertebrate Animals (3)


    A non-lab survey of the vertebrate classes for the online student. Discusses the evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the vertebrate animals. Includes a treatment of common vertebrates in the Southeastern states. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 524. Marine Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, ecology, physiology, and phylogenetic relationship of locally occurring marine invertebrate taxa. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 222 General Zoology (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 525. Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, behavior, physiology, and ecology of marine vertebrates with emphasis on species of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 222 General Zoology (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 526. Coastal Ornithology (4)


    Distribution, population dynamics, food habits, habitat analysis, and field identification of coastal and pelagic birds in Alabama. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 222 General Zoology (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 527. Biology of Fishes (4)


    Survey of the fishes emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology.
  
  •  

    BY 528. Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Survey of vertebrate classes emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor and Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 529. Entomology (4)


    Survey of the insects, emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor and Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 531. Histology (4)


    A study of the microscopic anatomy of tissues of vertebrates, particularly mammals. Three lecture and laboratory hours per week. A research project is required. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and one undergraduate course in Anatomy and Physiology.
  
  •  

    BY 540. Advanced Microbiology (3)


    Concepts and techniques relating to the morphology, taxonomy, physiology, and culture methods of microorganisms, with emphasis on those of special importance to humans. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 541. Environmental Toxicology (4)


    Overview of concepts and terminology combining several diverse disciplines to investigate how society creates, regulates, and perceives the effects of toxic substances in the environment. Health issues and approaches to control the major environmental health problems associated with various occupations in industrialized and developing countries will also be examined. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental science or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 542. Watershed Management (3)


    This course provides a basic and broad introduction to the watershed management field and offers an interdisciplinary approach to environmental imperatives currently facing our watersheds. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 550. Ecology (4)


    Relationship between individual organisms and their environment; the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems; and computer usage in data analysis and report writing. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Research project required. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and MH 246 Introduction to Biostatistics (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    BY 551. Marine Ecology (4)


    Bioenergetics, community structure, population dynamics, predation, competition, and speciation in marine ecosystems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany, BY 222 General Zoology, CH 112 General Chemistry II, and PH 201 College Physics I (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 553. Appalachian Ecology (4)


    A study of the biodiversity and geology of the Appalachian Mountains with particular focus on unique biological communities and the impact of natural and anthropogenic events on the landscape and ecology.
  
  •  

    BY 554. Conservation Biology (3)


    This course provides an introduction to the field of conservation biology and examines the relationships between human populations and biodiversity. Graduate project required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 555. Ecological Management (3)


    Management methods and factors affecting successful management of natural resources, with a look at several specific habitat types.  Online only.
  
  •  

    BY 556. Ecological Restoration (3)


    Exploration of basic principles of ecological restoration including physical, chemical, and biological manipulations required for restoration success. Additionally, this course will provide a detailed examination of practical aspects of restoration in selected ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  •  

    BY 557. Natural History of the Black Belt (3)


    The Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi is a unique and culturally significant region characterized by its geography, soils, prairies, and people. Experts in different fields survey the geography, history, archaeology, geologic history, paleontology, hydrology, biology, ecology, economics, and future of grassland, forest, aquatic, and urban environments of the Black Belt region. Three lecture hours per week and two Saturday field trips.
  
  •  

    BY 558. Subtropical Ecology (4)


    This course will provide an introduction to habitats and ecosystems of subtropical Florida. Students will gain insight into the natural and cultural history of some of the most unique and diverse habitats in North America. The course will include weekly meetings to discuss subtropical habitats, followed by a field trip. Upon return, students will develop a research paper and a presentation on a topic related to these habitats. A graduate research project is also required.
  
  •  

    BY 559. Alabama Natural Communities (4)


    This course provides an introduction to natural areas and biological communities of Alabama. Students will study and travel to many of Alabama’s diverse natural systems and examine the factors leading to the tremendous biodiversity of the state.
  
  •  

    BY 559. Wetlands Ecology (3)


    Focus on near shore wetland areas and emphasize biogeochemical processes, productivity, biodiversity and ecosystem function, as well as address the issues that threaten and protect these valuable and complex resources.  Online only. Prerequisites: BY 212 or BY 222.
  
  •  

    BY 560. Marine Science for Teachers (4)


    Materials and methods of instruction on marine topics. Survey of marine plants and animals, the communities they form, and physical and chemical factors which affect them. Various types of sampling, preservation, culturing, and identification procedures will be covered.
  
  •  

    BY 561. Aquatic Biology (4)


    Limnological principles, field techniques, and qualitative and quantitative study of aquatic ecosystems, especially freshwater systems in West Central Alabama. Research project and paper are required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
  
  •  

    BY 562. Oceanography (4)


    General introduction to the ocean with emphasis on geological, chemical, and physical processes and how they relate to biological systems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory for five weeks. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany, BY 222 General Zoology, CH 112 General Chemistry II, and PH 201 College Physics I (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
    (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 563. Marine Technical Methods (2)


    The hardware of marine science, sampling procedures, processing, station location, and field maintenance operation. Ten hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany and BY 222 General Zoology (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
    (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 564. Coastal Wetlands Ecology (4)


    Wetlands provide critical habitat for many aquatic and semi-aquatic species, improve water quality, and protect shorelines from floodwaters. This course focuses on coastal wetlands and emphasize biogeochemical processes, biodiversity and ecosystem function, as well as address the issues that threaten and protect these valuable resources. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island
  
  •  

    BY 565. Ecology of the Florida Everglades (2)


    This two-week course examines the natural history and ecology of one of the world’s rarest and most endangered wilderness areas, the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. Lectures and discussions during the first week are followed by eight days of field exploration within the Everglades and associated systems in southern Florida. Special fees apply. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island
  
  •  

    BY 567. Directed Studies in Marine Biology (1-8)


    Independent research in marine biology. Content and nature of the courses is determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 568. Selected Topics in Marine Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as marine fisheries science, or others. Research project required. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean. (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
  •  

    BY 571. Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of enzymes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Pre/Corequisite: CH 242.
  
  •  

    BY 572. Cell Biology (4)


    Cells and subcellular structures and such cellular processes as energy transformation, transport of materials, and growth. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany, BY 222 General Zoology, and CH 241 Organic Chemistry I (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu). 
  
  •  

    BY 573. Advanced Human Anatomy (3)


    This course involves the study of the major anatomical components of the human body. Other topics include pathology, embryology, and treatment of selected conditions. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 574. Human Physiology (4)


    This course is an in depth study of human medical physiology. Lab work will examine the underlying chemistry, physics, and biochemistry principles of body function. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and undergraduate coursework in Anatomy and Physiology.
  
  •  

    BY 575. Advanced Biological Chemistry (3)


    A detailed study of the macromolecules in organisms and the cellular events in which they are involved. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 576. Advanced Cell Biology (3)


    Cell Biology research uses living organisms to understand biological processes that can lead to the development of useful agricultural products, medicine and gene therapy. The impact and applications of Cell Biology on our society in medicine and agriculture industry is limitless. This course will introduce students to different concepts and methods used to study Cell Biology. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 580. Advanced Genetics (3)


    Genetics is the study of the mechanisms of inheritance and gene function. There are different disciplines of Genetics. This course will provide a comprehensive coverage of advanced molecular genetics. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 581. Principles of Biotechnology (3)


    Biotechnology research is one of the most significant and exciting scientific disciplines of the 21st century. Biotechnology research develops useful agricultural products, medicine and gene therapy. There are several products in the market manufactured by biotechnology methods or genetic engineering approaches. This course will introduce students to different concepts and methods used to develop products using biotechnology. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 582. Molecular Biology (4)


    Molecular Biology is the study of the functioning of genes at the molecular level, from DNA through RNA and proteins. Molecular Biology arose from the traditions of biochemistry, microbiology and genetics. Molecular biology research contributed to the deciphering of the complete human genome and many other organisms, which have many benefits to humans. Online Only.
  
  •  

    BY 590. Evolutionary Theory (3)


    Classical and modern concepts of evolution and the evolutionary relationship of extinct and extant forms of life. Three lecture hours per week. Research project required. Prerequisites: BY 212 General Botany and BY 222 General Zoology (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    BY 591. Biogeography (3)


    Distribution patterns of organisms and the historical and ecological factors contributing to those patterns. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor and Dean. Course in Ecology highly recommended.
  
  •  

    BY 592. Methods in Conservation Biology (3)


    Introduction to the current techniques used in the study of biological systems. Lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations.
  
  •  

    BY 593. Critical Issues in Conservation Biology (3)


    Introduction, discussion and exploration of the current challenges facing the field of conservation biology.
  
  •  

    BY 597. Directed Studies in Biology (1-8)


    Content and nature of the courses is determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. A research project is required. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    BY 598. Selected Topics in Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as biological illustrations, helminthology, histology, protozoology, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    BY 599. Thesis in the Biological Sciences (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA)

  
  •  

    BA 500. Business Seminar (1)


    This course examines contemporary issues in business administration. The professional seminar supplements the core and elective courses in the area of business administration by focusing on issues of current and special interest. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs. Participation requirements may include the authoring and presenting of a research paper at regional or national conferences in conjunction with faculty. Graduate students may apply a maximum of 3 credit hours of these seminars as electives to meet the credit-hour requirements for graduation.
  
  •  

    BA 507. Independent Study (3)


    Collaboration between faculty and student to complete a research endeavor or to facilitate the individual completion of a graduate business course within the required or elective course lists. The faculty member and student may collaborate to present research findings at conferences or to submit journal articles (may be repeated only once).
  
  •  

    BA 508. Special Topics (3)


    This course is a study of current issues, opportunities, and areas of special interest in business administration that are not contained within the existing foundational or elective courses. Participation requirements may include the authoring and presenting of a research paper at regional or national conferences in conjunction with faculty.
  
  •  

    BA 560. Comparative Business Law and Ethics (3)


    This course examines the central features (infrastructures) as well as selective and substantive rules of the legal systems operating in North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Australia, and Asia concerning both civil and criminal legal structures that affect business environments.
  
  •  

    BA 580. Business Intelligence and Analysis (3)


    Methodologies and issues related to the design and completion of business research projects through which intelligence is gained and used to facilitate the rendering of human business decisions. Topics include SWOT analysis, competitive analysis, ratio analysis, and other data analysis that is especially useful for business research (focus groups, customer visits, conjoint analysis, and multidimensional scaling). Topics also include the use of intelligence cycle to influence product and service designs, to influence or embellish human decisions, and to enhance overall strategic competitiveness.
  
  •  

    BA 599. Project (6)


    Project that applies problem-solving toward the application of business theory within a business setting.

BUSINESS QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (BQ)

  
  •  

    BQ 571. Statistical Analysis (3)


    Students learn analytical tools involving combinatorics, probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, generating functions, moments, special distributions, multivariate distributions, independence, distributions of functions of random variables, transformations, sampling distributions, limiting distributions, point estimation, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio tests, analysis of variance, reliability, validity, correlation, regression, and chi-square tests. Analytical methods are explored from the perspective of rendering business decisions.
  
  •  

    BQ 575. Operations Research (3)


    This course is an examination of optimum resource allocation emphasizing the application of quantitative methods. Topics include: optimum values, minimum and maximum values with and without constraints, queuing, linear models and techniques; simplex method; transportation and assignment methods; Markov chains; artificial variables; duality; integer programming; Poisson processes; Game theory; forecasting techniques; network models; tree structures; simulation and sensitivity; scheduling and replacement; and sequencing problems.

CHEMISTRY (CH)

  
  •  

    CH 503. Chemistry for the Secondary Teacher (3)


    Recent trends in chemical research and instruction, materials and methods for teaching chemistry, and the major concepts of chemistry. Research project is required. Prerequisites: Twenty three semester hours of Chemistry.
  
  •  

    CH 522. Instrumental Analysis (4)


    Theory and application of instrumental methods of chemical analysis, with an emphasis on spectroscopy, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 321. Pre/Corequisite: CH 352 or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 531. Inorganic Chemistry (3)


    Advanced concepts in theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with emphasis on bonding theories, symmetry and group theory. Three lecture hours per week. Pre/Corequisite: CH 351.
  
  •  

    CH 571. Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of enzymes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Pre/Corequisite: CH 242.
  
  •  

    CH 572. Biochemistry II (4)


    Study of metabolism including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, phosphorylation, photosynthesis and biosynthesis. Expression and transmission of genetic information. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 471 Biochemistry I or BY 471 Biochemistry I (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    CH 580. Forensic Chemistry (4)


    Investigation of the preparation and analysis of forensic samples from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used to analyze forensic evidence. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242 Organic Chemistry II (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    CH 598. Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-4)


    Nature and content of the course are determined by the interest and needs of the students. Research project required. Prerequisites: Nine semester hours in Chemistry.

COMMUNITY COUNSELING (CC)

  
  •  

    CC 501. Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)


    Students will explore foundations, contextual dimensions, and practice of clinical mental health counseling.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CS)

  
  •  

    CS 505. Programming Language Design (3)


    An introduction to programming language specification and analysis. Additional topics include history of programming languages; appropriate types of languages for various types of problems; control structures, data types and structures, run-time environments, binding strategies, compilers, and interpreters. Prerequisites: familiarity with a programming language.
  
  •  

    CS 507. Independent Study (3)


    Independent study in computer information systems. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of students.
  
  •  

    CS 510. Computer Organization (3)


    Topics includes data representation, logic gates, simplification of logical expressions, design and analysis of simple combination circuits such as decoders and multiplexers, flip-flops and registers, design and analysis of simple synchronous sequential circuit, random-access and read-only memories, instruction set architecture and programming in assembly language.
  
  •  

    CS 540. Operating Systems (3)


    Operating system theory and concepts including supervisory functions, management of files, processes, and memory. Includes some hands-on use of current operating systems such as UNIX and Windows. Network operating systems introduced through a local area network. Prerequisites: CS 505 .
  
  •  

    CS 550. Internet Applications (3)


    Fundamentals of creating and designing effective web pages, using XHTML, graphics, CSS, audio, and video files. Visual web development tools are used to enhance website appeal and functionality. Prerequisites: CS 505 .
  
  •  

    CS 570. Emerging Technologies (3)


    Considerations of emerging technologies, how they evolve, how to identify them, and the effect of international, political, social, economic and cultural factors on them. Topics covered in the course include accuracy of past technology forecasts, how to improve them, international perspective on emerging technologies, future customer trends, and forecasting methodologies such as monitoring, expert opinion, trend analysis, and scenario construction. Integration of emerging technologies among organizational settings to embellish human decisions.
  
  •  

    CS 580. Systems Project (3)


    This course represents an information systems capstone experience. Students integrate materials learned within their preceding courses toward demonstrating the ability to synthesize and apply information systems concepts among various simulated business and organizational decisions and scenarios strategically, tactically, and operationally.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6