2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue 
    
    Oct 28, 2020  
2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 4


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Anthropology (AN)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
College Teaching (CT)
Community Counseling (CC)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
English (EH)
Environmental Science (EN)
Finance (FI)

History (HY)
Instructional Leadership (IL)
Journalism (JN)
Library Media (LM)
Management (MN)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Online Teaching (OT)
Physical Education (PE)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
School Counseling (SC)
Sociology (SY)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Student Affairs (SA)
Teacher Leader (TL)
Theatre (TH)

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at the University of West Alabama is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

The University of West Alabama uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

500-599 — courses for masters-level students
600-699 — courses for Education Specialist-level students

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

EDUCATION (ED)

  
  •  

    ED 602. The Legal Context of Education (3)


    An analysis of the legal issues prevalent in educational systems. Discussion of regulatory issues, federal and state constituents and laws, and institutional and individual legal issues. Review of case laws and specific pieces of education legislation.
  
  •  

    ED 603. Leadership for Enhanced Student Achievement (3)


    Study of the organizational behavior in schools, which emphasizes the practical relevance of leadership in this era of accountability and high-stakes testing. Topics include: development theories and collaborative planning models for enhanced professional practice which includes; distributed leadership, professional learning communities, stakeholder involvement, and sustainable leadership to impact student growth.  Ten hours of embedded field experiences required.
  
  •  

    ED 604. Advanced Educational Research (3)


    The focus of this course is to provide advanced graduate students knowledge and skills to combine the theoretical aspects of research with the knowledge base of their specialty areas of study. Students are expected to define acceptable questions for study, determine an appropriate research design based on the questions asked, and develop methodically acceptable analytic procedures. It is expected students will have the requisite knowledge of research and statistics, and acceptable skill in writing.
  
  •  

    ED 605. Teaching English Language Learners (3)


    This course explores strategies and techniques to support the success of language and culturally diverse students. The values, customs, and communication styles of cultural groups and their implication for teaching are considered. Research-based instructional approaches to developing English learner literacy will be examined.
  
  •  

    ED 697. Selected Topics in Education (3)


    Specialized study of selected topics in education. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.  May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    ED 698. Selected Topics in Education (3)


    Specialized study of selected topics in education. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs.  Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.  May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EP)

  
  •  

    EP 500. Advanced Educational Psychology (3)


    A systematic approach to the application of psychology to the learning process.
  
  •  

    EP 506. Life-Span Development and Learning (3)


    Physical, social, cognitive, and emotional development during the life-span of human beings.
  
  •  

    EP 510. Advanced Theories of Learning (3)


    A systematic approach to the application of psychology to the learning process and the theories of learning. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    EP 597. Independent Study in Educational Psychology (1-3)


    Offers the qualified graduate student an opportunity for independent study in educational psychology. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EP 598. Selected Topics in Educational Psychology (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in educational psychology not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean. May be repeated for six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    EP 599. Thesis in Counseling/Psychology (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of College of Education.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (EE)

  
  •  

    EE 500. Teaching Reading (3)


    A variety of approaches to reading instruction emphasizing developmental reading and reading in the content areas.
  
  •  

    EE 503. Teaching Basic Skills in Reading (3)


    Intensive study of reading skills and techniques for evaluating reading proficiency. Prerequisites: One course in reading at graduate or undergraduate level.
  
  •  

    EE 504. Corrective and Remedial Reading (3)


    Causes of disability, procedures in diagnosis, and classroom remedial treatment of reading programs.
  
  •  

    EE 506. Literature for Children and Young Adults (3)


    Evaluation of major literary genre, motivational techniques for encouraging life-long reading habits in children and young adults.
  
  •  

    EE 520. Current Trends in Elementary Education (3)


    Critical review of prominent issues and practices affecting program organization, management and instruction in grades K-6.
  
  •  

    EE 523. Mathematics in the Elementary School (3)


    Survey of materials and methods used in teaching K-6 mathematics, with emphasis on mathematics content, use of manipulatives, problem-solving and incorporation of calculators and computers in teaching.
  
  •  

    EE 524. Social Studies in the Elementary School (3)


    Materials and procedures of unit teaching in primary and intermediate grade social studies programs.
  
  •  

    EE 525. Science in the Elementary School (3)


    Survey of materials and methods used in teaching K-6 science, with emphasis on a hands-on, inquiry-oriented approach to teaching product and process.
  
  •  

    EE 526. Language Arts in the Elementary School (3)


    Objectives, content, and instructional procedures in teaching language arts including oral and written expression. Emphasis on student needs.
  
  •  

    EE 527. Directed Studies in Elementary Teaching (1-3)


    Independent study and research in an area of elementary education. Individual needs and interests determine content and nature of course. Research and/or critical paper required. Maximum six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean.
  
  •  

    EE 528. Directed Studies in Elementary Teaching (1-3)


    Independent study and research in an area of elementary education. Individual needs and interests determine content and nature of course. Research and/or critical paper required. Maximum six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean.
  
  •  

    EE 529. Internship in Elementary Education (3)


    Meets requirements of State Department of Education for Alternative A programs and add-on certification in grades K-6. Requires 4-14 weeks of full-time internship at cooperating public school.
  
  •  

    EE 597. Independent Study in Elementary Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified graduate student an opportunity for independent study in elementary education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers are required. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EE 598. Selected Topics in Elementary Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in elementary education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EE 599. Thesis in Elementary Education (3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.
  
  •  

    EE 620. Teaching the Diverse Learner (3)


    The focus of the course is on adjusting the school curriculum to create and manage a positive learning environment for a diverse population of elementary students.
  
  •  

    EE 621. Teaching Reading in the Content Areas (3)


    The focus of the course is on theory, research, and methods for teaching elementary school students to use literacy as a tool for learning.
  
  •  

    EE 622. Learning Theory and Instructional Practice in Elementary Mathematics and Science (3)


    This course is a seminar type course to include research, trends, and methods in science and math instruction in the elementary school.
  
  •  

    EE 623. Best Practices in Language Arts (3)


    This course is a seminar type course that focuses on trends, innovations, policy, and the function of research in the teaching of language arts in the elementary school.
  
  •  

    EE 624. Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Programs (3)


    The focus of the course is on historical and contemporary early childhood programs and the theoretical foundation for early childhood education.
  
  •  

    EE 627. Educational Assessment (3)


    The focus of this course is on student performance and includes the identification of learning goals, the diagnosis of student needs, the provision for effective instruction with feedback, and the use of assessment results to improve teaching and learning.
  
  •  

    EE 628. School Reform Models in Elementary Schools (3)


    The focus of the course is on analyzing current school reform models; researching school improvement plans; and devising a school improvement plan. Prerequisites: EE 627 .

ENGLISH (EH)

  
  •  

    EH 501. Research in Literary Studies (3)


    A survey of contemporary literary theory and criticism, as well as advanced instruction in research techniques and library resources, through the investigation of a specific problem in English or American literature.
  
  •  

    EH 510. Twentieth-Century Poetry (3)


    A study of works of major American and British poets of the twentieth century from Thomas Hardy to the present, including Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Plath.
  
  •  

    EH 521. Chaucer and Selected Medieval Literature (3)


    Focus on the Canterbury Tales, with additional readings of poems, mystery plays, and romances by other authors.
  
  •  

    EH 522. Shakespeare (3)


    A study of Shakespeare’s works, with a focus on the tragedies from Romeo and Juliet through Macbeth.
  
  •  

    EH 523. English Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3)


    A study of the poetry of John Donne and the Metaphysical poets, Ben Jonson and the Cavalier poets, and John Milton, primarily Paradise Lost.
  
  •  

    EH 524. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3)


    British prose, poetry, and drama from 1660 to 1800, including such writers as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson.
  
  •  

    EH 525. Nineteenth-Century English Poetry (3)


    Selections from the poetry of major Romantic and Victorian poets.
  
  •  

    EH 526. The English Novel (3)


    Examination of six to eight works of various periods and types in the development of the English novel.
  
  •  

    EH 527. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century English Literature (3)


    Intensive study of three or four nineteenth-century British writers related by such factors as period, theme, technique, or gender. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    EH 528. Seminar in Twentieth-Century English Literature (3)


    An intensive study of four or more twentieth-century writers related by such factors as period, theme, technique, or gender. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    EH 532. William Faulkner (3)


    A study of the fiction of William Faulkner.
  
  •  

    EH 533. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (3)


    An intensive study of three or four nineteenth-century American writers related by such factors as period, gender, theme, or technique. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    EH 534. Seminar in Twentieth-Century American Literature (3)


    An intensive study of three or four twentieth-century American writers related by such factors as period, gender, theme, or technique. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    EH 536. The American Novel (3)


    A study of the novel in the United States, as revealed in close examination of six to eight novels.
  
  •  

    EH 540. Literary Criticism (3)


    A study of traditional and contemporary criticism and theory.
  
  •  

    EH 550. Contemporary Fiction (3)


    A study of fiction written in English, as revealed in an examination of 6-8 works written from 1955 to present.
  
  •  

    EH 560. Advanced Grammar and Linguistics (3)


    Survey and analysis of traditional, structural, and transformational systems of grammar.
  
  •  

    EH 570. Advanced Creative Writing (3)


    For students who have earned credit in EH 370 Creative Writing (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu) and other qualified students, an opportunity to continue their writing.
  
  •  

    EH 580. Teaching Composition (3)


    Preparation for the teaching of writing, emphasizing the presentation of content in an organized, well-developed, and stylistically correct manner.
  
  •  

    EH 588. Field Experience in English Language Arts Teaching (3)


    Tutoring of students in English Language Arts classes or in the Writing Center under the supervision of a classroom teacher; observation and assistance to the classroom teacher, two to three days a week.
  
  •  

    EH 589. Tutorial Practicum for Teachers (1)


    Tutoring in Writing Center under supervision of the Director. May be repeated for maximum of three semester hours.
  
  •  

    EH 597. Directed Studies in English (1-3)


    Independent study and/or research in literature or English language. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. A maximum of six hours may be earned in this course. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 598. Selected Topics in English (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EH 599. Thesis Research (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (EN)

  
  •  

    EN 501. Research Seminar in Environmental Sciences (1)


    Lectures, discussions, and reviews of environmental topics by staff, students, and guest speakers. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 504. Research Design and Data Analysis (3)


    A study of the planning, organizing, and implementing of scientific research experiments. Computer based data treatment, graphing, and analysis methods are covered in detail. Prerequisites: Computer proficiency in Microsoft Excel and Word is critical.
  
  •  

    EN 508. Teaching College Environmental Science (3)


    The role of environmental science in the curriculum, types and levels of courses, and techniques of teaching. Development of teaching materials and teaching observation required.
  
  •  

    EN 516. Endangered Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of the federally listed plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, distribution, pertinent environmental factors, and conservation efforts for each species. The legal process of how a species becomes federally listed is also considered.
  
  •  

    EN 517. Invasive Species of Alabama (3)


    A survey of invasive plant and animal species that occur in Alabama with emphasis on biology, habitat, pertinent environmental factors, biological strategies and control efforts for each species. The overarching impact to the natural landscape and how they impact humans is also considered.
  
  •  

    EN 518. The Tombigbee River (4)


    A two-week ecological field study of the Tombigbee River basin. Participants travel the basin by land and water while camping. Topics covered will include the relevant geology, hydrology, ecology, economics, water quality, and history of the Tombigbee River basin.
  
  •  

    EN 541. Environmental Toxicology (4)


    Overview of concepts and terminology combining several diverse disciplines to investigate how society creates, regulates, and perceives the effects of toxic substances in the environment. Health issues and approaches to control the major environmental health problems associated with various occupations in industrialized and developing countries will also be examined. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours in biology or environmental science or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EN 542. Watershed Management (3)


    This course provides a basic and broad introduction to the watershed management field and offers an interdisciplinary approach to environmental imperatives currently facing our watersheds. Online Only.
  
  •  

    EN 550. Environmental Health and Safety Management (3)


    Environmental features and policies necessary for responsible health and safety management from perspective of the environmental manager. One or more research projects and/or papers are required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 551. Industrial Hygiene (3)


    Planning and implementation of programs to minimize occupational health hazards. Procedures and methods to recognize, evaluate, and control occupational health hazards are emphasized. One or more research projects and/or papers are required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 553. Appalachian Ecology (4)


    A study of the biodiversity and geology of the Appalachian Mountains with particular focus on unique biological communities and the impact of natural and anthropogenic events on the landscape and ecology.
  
  •  

    EN 554. Conservation Biology (3)


    This course provides an introduction to the field of conservation biology and examines the relationship between human populations and biodiversity. Graduate project required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  •  

    EN 555. Ecological Management (3)


    Management methods and factors affecting successful management of natural resources, with a look at several specific habitat types.  Online only.
  
  •  

    EN 556. Ecological Restoration (3)


    Exploration of basic principles of ecological restoration including physical, chemical, and biological manipulations required for restoration success. Additionally, this course will provide a detailed examination of practical aspects of restoration in selected ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 558. Subtropical Ecology (4)


    This course will provide an introduction to habitats and ecosystems of subtropical Florida. Students will gain insight into the natural and cultural history of some of the most unique and diverse habitats in North America. The course will include weekly meetings to discuss subtropical habitats, followed by a 7 day field trip. Upon return, students will develop a research paper and a presentation on a topic related to these habitats. A graduate research project is also required.
  
  •  

    EN 559. Wetlands Ecology (3)


     

    Focus on near shore wetland areas and emphasize biogeochemical processes, productivity, biodiversity and ecosystem function, as well as address the issues that threaten and protect these valuable and complex resources. Online only. Prerequisites: BY 212 or BY 222.

  
  •  

    EN 570. Environmental Chemistry (4)


    The application of chemical and biochemical principles to environmental problems and their solutions. Emphasis is placed on the behavior of pollutants in the natural ecosystem and their management. One or more research projects and/or papers are required. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 580. Environmental Law (3)


    Governmental regulations that seek to insure the quality of the environmental and the safety of the work place. One or more research projects and/or papers are required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 597. Independent Study in Environmental Sciences (1-8)


    Content and nature of the course determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects or papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester. May be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 598. Selected Topics in Environmental Sciences (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics and format of the course. One of more research projects and/or papers are required. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    EN 599. Thesis in Environmental Sciences (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.

FINANCE (FI)

  
  •  

    FI 507. Independent Study in Finance (3)


    Collaboration between faculty and student to complete a research endeavor or to facilitate the individual completion of a graduate finance course within the required or elective course lists. The faculty member and student may collaborate to present research findings at conferences or to submit journal articles.
  
  •  

    FI 508. Special Topics in Finance (3)


    This course is a study of current issues, opportunities, and areas of special interest in finance that are not contained within the existing foundational or elective courses. Participation requirements may include the authoring and presenting of a research paper at regional or national conferences in conjunction with faculty.
  
  •  

    FI 511. Behavioral Finance and Organizational Decisions (3)


    This course is a study of the key psychological obstacles to value-maximizing behaviors and methods of mitigating their effects. Topics include the underlying factors and processes that result in non-optimal decisions; perceptions about risk and reward and financial decision making in the areas of investing, trading, valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, agency conflicts, corporate governance, and mergers and acquisitions.
  
  •  

    FI 513. Financial Management (3)


    Topics include cost of capital, value of the firm, derivative securities, efficient capital markets, capital structure, capital budgeting, forecasting, financial statement analysis, mergers, leasing versus purchasing, financial ratio analysis, and other relevant topics are covered in the contexts of value and wealth maximization.
  
  •  

    FI 514. Non-Profit Financial Management (3)


    This course provides an overview of finance from the perspective of public entities, non-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and government organizations. Topics include incorporation, funding and funding proposals, grants, taxation, financial decisions, responsibilities of financial officers to stakeholders, principal-agency issues, financial fraud, financial constraints, financial decisions, ethics, and the use of limited financial resources to maximize the fulfilling of organizational mission and societal benefit.
  
  •  

    FI 550. International Finance and Capital Markets (3)


    This course is an analysis of operation and regulation of international financial markets for derivatives (options, futures, and swaps), equities, debt, and currencies. Topics include financial aspects of multinational enterprises emphasizing balance of payments, foreign exchange risk management, international money and capital markets, multinational treasury functions, and political risk analysis.
  
  •  

    FI 551. International Financial Statement Analysis (3)


    Analysis of financial statements from a global perspective, with a primary focus on International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The tools of financial statement analysis will be used to evaluate companies and ultimately to make decisions regarding debt and equity investments. Note: a student who received credit for FI 450. International Financial Statement Analysis at the undergraduate level cannot enroll in FI 551.

FIRE SCIENCE MANAGEMENT (FSC)

  
  •  

    FSC 500. Executive Development (3)


    This course is intended to provide a framework in which leadership is a process whereby you and others perform adaptive work. The three primary curriculum themes of the course are leadership, research, and change. Through a combination of theory, case-study analysis, reflection, introspection, and self- and observer-based assessment, participants learn how to enhance personal/ team development and engage in applied research. This course is comparable with FESCHE R0123.
  
  •  

    FSC 505. Executive Analysis of Community Risk Reduction (3)


    This course is a mixture of philosophy and application–the value of the community risk reduction and the process of applying risk reduction to the community. It involves developing partnerships with the community to implement programs, initiatives, and services that prevent and/or mitigate the risk of human caused or natural disasters. Traditional fire prevention programs are addressed. This course is comparable with FESCHE R0274.
  
  •  

    FSC 510. Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management (3)


    This course is designed to prepare senior staff officers in the administrative functions necessary to manage the operational component of a fire and rescue department effectively. Since the subject matter is comprehensive, maximum use of the students’ time is required. Some of the areas covered are risk assessment, incident documentation, media/political considerations, standards, legal mandates, capability assessment, damage assessment, emergency operations, Integrated Emergency Management System (IEMS), Multi-Agency Coordination Systems (MACS) including the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), and emergency information systems. This course is comparable with FESCHE R0306.
  
  •  

    FSC 515. Executive Leadership (3)


    This course includes self- and observer-based multi-rater assessment instruments, case-study analysis, role playing, and adaptive problem consult, experiential activities, and a staff ride. Participants complete a ‘personal plan’ to assess currency and then create goals in four areas of professional, personal, community, and family life. This course is comparable with FESCHE R0125.

HISTORY (HY)

  
  •  

    HY 500. The Historian’s Craft (3)


    A readings-based introduction to the leading historical schools, the development of the historical profession, and the research methodologies employed by professional historians.
  
  •  

    HY 503. The First World War (3)


    A study of the origins of the First World War emphasizing the evolution of strategy, operations, and tactics.
  
  •  

    HY 504. The Second World War (3)


    A study of warfare from 1931 through 1945, emphasizing strategy, operations and tactics.
  
  •  

    HY 505. War of the Modern Age (3)


    The study of war and warfare from 1859 through September 11, 2001, with an emphasis on the evolution of strategy, operations, and tactics.
  
  •  

    HY 506. Film and History (3)


    A survey of the history of film and development of film within its cultural context. The course will include frequent discussions of the proper use of film in the classroom.
  
  •  

    HY 507. Directed Studies in History (1-3)


    Independent study and/or research in history. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. A maximum of six hours may be earned in this course. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean
  
  •  

    HY 508. Meaning of the First World War (3)


    An examination of the intellectual and cultural background of “the Great War,” and its continuing impact on intellectual and cultural life of the modern world.
  
  •  

    HY 509. Internship (3)


    Supervised internship with a departmentally-approved public history facility, archival institution, or historical journal. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: At least six hours of graduate-level history courses, letter of agreement from the host institution, and approval of both the supervising faculty member and the department chair.
  
  •  

    HY 510. American Diplomatic History (3)


    A study of the diplomatic events and foreign policy decisions in American history, with special emphasis on the United States as a world power.
  
  •  

    HY 511. Colonial/Revolutionary America (3)


    A survey of the history of Colonial America from the age of discovery to the adoption of the Constitution.
 

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