2016 - 2017 General Catalogue 
    
    Mar 28, 2020  
2016 - 2017 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 10


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Agribusiness (AB)
Air Force Studies (AFS)
Anthropology (AN)
Art (AT)
Athletic Training (AH)
Automotive Technician (AU)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
English (EH)
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Environmental Science (EN)
Exercise Science (EX)
Finance (FI)
French (FR)
Geography (GY)

Geology (GE)
Graduate Management Admission Testing (GMAT)
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
History (HY)
Homeland Security (HS)
Honors Program (HR)
Journalism (JN)
Management (MG)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Music (MU)
Nursing (NS)
Philosophy (PL)
Physical Education (PE)
Physics (PH)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
Social Work (SW)
Sociology (SY)
Spanish (SP)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Sports Management (SM)
Student Affairs Leadership (SAL)
Technology (TY)
Theatre (TH)
University Experience (UWA)
Varsity Athletics (VA)
Welding Technology (WT)

 

 

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA)

  
  •  

    BA 363. Advanced Business Law (3)


    Administrative law, intellectual property, securities law, property, investment, estates, and trusts, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, secured interest, banking and lease contracts. Prerequisites: BA 263 .
  
  •  

    BA 400. Professional Development Seminar (3)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. This course includes professional communications, interviewing skills and career planning strategies, facilitation and presentation skills, and business etiquette. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300 , and junior or senior standing.
  
  •  

    BA 401. Professional Development Seminar I (1)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. This first required course is a foundational course in professional development and career planning. Students should participate in at least one of the following activities: a student, professional, and/or civic organization, reading assignment, or other activities as approved by the instructor. The selected activities must provide opportunities for soft skills development related to positive personal attributes for career success. The selected activities may not be repeated in BA 402, 403, or 404.  The benchmark Major Field Test in Business is administered. Prerequisites: 60-75 credit hours (rising junior).
  
  •  

    BA 402. Professional Development Seminar II (1)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. A continuation of BA 401. This second required course in professional development and career planning includes an emphasis on communication skills. Students should participate in at least one of the following activities: a community service project, seminar, webinar, or other activities as approved by instructor. The selected activity must provide opportunities for soft skills development related to positive personal attributes for career success. The selected activities may not be repeated in BA 403  or BA 404  . Prerequisites: BA 401  and 76-90 credit hours (junior standing).
  
  •  

    BA 403. Professional Development Seminar III (1)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. A continuation of BA 402 . This third required course in professional development and career planning includes an emphasis on work shadowing. Students should participate in work shadowing or other activities as approved by the instructor. The selected activities must provide opportunities for soft skills development related to positive personal attributes for career success. The selected activities may not be repeated in BA 404 . Prerequisites: BA 401  , BA 402 , and 90-105 credit hours (rising senior).
  
  •  

    BA 404. Professional Development Seminar IV (1)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. A continuation of BA 403  . This final required course in professional development and career planning includes an emphasis on presentation skills and a comprehensive portfolio. Students should participate in a professional development activity as approved by the instructor. The selected activity must provide opportunities for soft skills development related to positive personal attributes for career success. Prerequisites: BA 401 , BA 402 , BA 403 , and 106 or more credit hours (senior standing).
  
  •  

    BA 407. Independent Study in Business (1-3)


    Independent study in business. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the students. Required research paper and projects. Maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BA 408. Selected Topics in Business (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Content determined by student interest and need. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    BA 420. Business Communications (3)


    Develops skill in written and verbal expression for more effective communication in business, including the job search. Prerequisites: EH 102  or EH 103 , or EH 213 -EH 214  or EH 221 -EH 222  or EH 231 -EH 232 , and MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300 , all ESL requirements, second semester of junior year and/or senior standing.
  
  •  

    BA 450. International Business Seminar (3)


    An overview of the major forms of international business. A study of the impact of the world economy, international trade, and political and social environments on international management problems of business organizations. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300  and junior standing.
  
  •  

    BA 460. Business Administration Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of business administration theories and concepts Prerequisites: Senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.

BUSINESS QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (BQ)

  
  •  

    BQ 271. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)


    Introduction to basic concepts of statistics including descriptive statistics, elements of probability theory, sampling, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MH 113 .
  
  •  

    BQ 371. Advanced Business Statistics (3)


    Study of systems and estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square tests, correlation and linear regression. Includes the use of computer software packages and data analysis. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in BQ 271  and   .

CHEMISTRY (CH)

  
  •  

    CH 101. Introductory General Chemistry (4)


    An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry. Designed for students pursuing non-science degrees. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    CH 111. General Chemistry I (4)


    Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics will include atomic and molecular structure, theories of bonding, properties of the elements, and stoichiometry. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Students with an ACT math subscore of 23 or higher may take CH 111 concurrently with MH 113 . Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
  •  

    CH 112. General Chemistry II (4)


    Continuation of CH 111. Topics will include thermodynamics, solutions, equilibrium, and kinetics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 111 
  
  •  

    CH 241. Organic Chemistry I (4)


    General principles and theories of organic chemistry including bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, functional groups, and reactions of hydrocarbons. Three lecture and four laboratory hours each week. Prerequisites: CH 112 .
  
  •  

    CH 242. Organic Chemistry II (4)


    Spectroscopic interpretations and reaction mechanisms of various functional groups including carbonyl groups. Three lecture and four laboratory hours each week. Prerequisites: CH 241 .
  
  •  

    CH 289. Laboratory Practicum (1)


    Provides an introduction to planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory activities. Emphasis on use of laboratory equipment, safety regulations, hazardous waste disposal, setup of experiments and teaching resources. Two contact hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 112  and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 307. Independent Study in Chemistry (1-4)


    Content and nature of the course determined by individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. May be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 308. Seminar in Chemistry (1)


    Study of current issues in chemistry through literature review and oral presentations. Emphasis is placed on the retrieval of information from scientific journals and online databases. Prerequisites: Sixteen hours of chemistry.
  
  •  

    CH 321. Analytical Chemistry (4)


    Theory and practice of analytical chemistry, with an emphasis on volumetric and gravimetric techniques. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 112 .
  
  •  

    CH 351. Physical Chemistry I (4)


    Principles of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242   and   or PH 212 .
  
  •  

    CH 352. Physical Chemistry II (4)


    Principles of quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242   and   or PH 212 .
  
  •  

    CH 360. Environmental Chemistry (3)


    Chemical processes in the air, water, and soil with an emphasis on the sources and effects of pollution. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of chemistry or permission of Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 408. Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-4)


    Nature and content of the course are determined by the interests and needs of the students. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of chemistry and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 422. Instrumental Analysis (4)


    Theory and application of instrumental methods of chemical analysis, with an emphasis on spectroscopy, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 321 . Corequisites:   or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 431. Inorganic Chemistry (3)


    Advanced concepts in theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with emphasis on bonding theories, symmetry and group theory. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 351 .
  
  •  

    CH 471. Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of enzymes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 242 .
  
  •  

    CH 472. Biochemistry II (3)


    Study of metabolism including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, phosphorylation, photosynthesis and biosynthesis. Expression and transmission of genetic information. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 471  or BY 471 .
  
  •  

    CH 480. Forensic Chemistry (4)


    Investigation of the preparation and analysis of forensic samples from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used to analyze forensic evidence. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242 .
  
  •  

    CH 491. Undergraduate Research (1-3)


    Student participation in a research project under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CS)

  
  •  

    CS 205. Microcomputer Applications (3)


    Introductory computer concepts and microcomputer usage covering productivity software packages such as word processing, electronic spreadsheets, presentation software, and database management systems.
  
  •  

    CS 206. Advanced Microcomputer Applications (3)


    This course is a continuation of CS 205  in which students utilize the advanced features of topics covered in CS 205 . Advanced functions and integration of word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation packages among other topics are incorporated into the course and are to be applied to situations found in business and industry. Prerequisites: CS 205 .
  
  •  

    CS 210. Introduction to CIS (3)


    An introduction to computer and information technology that includes an overview of the history of computing, fundamental computer concepts, current state of the art, and future directions in research.
  
  •  

    CS 215. PC Maintenance and Support


    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to acquire an entry level position as PC Technicians or IT Professionals. Material covers topics from the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) A+ certification exam.
  
  •  

    CS 280. Network Communication (3)


    An introduction to the fundamentals of data communications and computer networks. Provides the student with a conceptual foundation for the study of data communications using the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) layered architecture model. Both technical and managerial aspects of data communications and networks are covered. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in   and “C” or higher in CS 210  or “C” or higher in CS 205  for non-CIS majors.
  
  •  

    CS 285. Network Maintenance and Support (3)


    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform entry level tasks of Network Technicians or Network Administrators. The material will include topics covered by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) Network+ certification exam.
  
  •  

    CS 300. Programming I (3)


    The introductory computer programming course for CIS majors. Current programming concepts and program development principles and practices. The basic constructs of the programming languages are covered. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 210  and “C” or higher in MH 113 . (For Engineering Technology Majors “C” or higher in CS 205  or CS 210  and MH 113 ).
  
  •  

    CS 301. Programming II (3)


    The second course in a series of programming courses for CIS majors. Includes more advanced concepts and object-oriented programming development principles. Introduces advanced constructs and addresses advanced data structures such as records, sequential files, pointers, and multi-dimensional arrays. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 305. Computerized Data Analysis (3)


    Fundamentals of spreadsheets and proper usage of their commands, macros, and functions. Building spreadsheets, creating graphs and formulas for financial analysis by using Microsoft Excel. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 205 .
  
  •  

    CS 310. Ethics in CIS (3)


    An introduction to theories of ethics as related to the use of computer and information technology and the associated social and ethical implications. Includes intellectual property, copyright, computer crime, ownership of personal data, freedom of speech, the right to privacy, and codes of ethical and professional conduct for IT practitioners. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300  and junior/senior standing or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    CS 320. Visual Basic (3)


    Object-oriented programming using the Windows environment. Includes language basics, database interfacing and arrays. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 205  or “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
  •  

    CS 340. Operating Systems (3)


    Operating system theory and concepts including supervisory functions, management of files, processes, and memory. Includes some hands-on use of current operating systems such as UNIX, MS-DOS, and Windows. Network operating systems introduced through a local area network. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 350. Internet Applications (3)


    Fundamentals of developing and designing effective web pages and mobile apps, using XHTML, programming, graphics, CSS, audio, and video files. Visual application development tools are used to enhance the appeal and functionality of websites and mobile apps. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CS 205  or grade of “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
  •  

    CS 370. Data Structures (3)


    Advanced data structures including linked lists, trees, graphs, and networks and the algorithms used to manage these structures. Hands-on application in program development using these algorithms. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 301 .
  
  •  

    CS 375. GUI Programming (3)


    This course introduces graphical user interfaces and event driven programming models in high level programming languages such as Java or C++. Additional topics include design, prototyping, evaluation of user interfaces (HCI), and basic techniques for modeling, rendering, and animation. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    CS 381. Network Administration I (3)


    Introduces Client/Server networking features associated with network operating systems related to the needs of business, industry, and government agencies. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 280 .
  
  •  

    CS 382. Network Administration II (3)


    Introduces the installation, networking, and security concepts of servers as related to the needs of business, industry, and government agencies. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in CS 381 .
  
  •  

    CS 383. Network Infrastructure (3)


    Study of the network requirements that drive infrastructure design decisions, options, strategies, practices, and scalability needed in order to design a functional network. Prerequisites: grade of “C” or higher in CS 382 .
  
  •  

    CS 390. Information Security (3)


    Introduces concepts of information security including organizational policy on confidentiality, authentication, integrity, nonrepudiation, access control, and availability and mechanisms to implement those services. Covers different types of security including physical security, computer security, and network security; common threats to and attacks against information systems, including accidental damage, identity thefts, malicious software, and “spam” and defensive measures. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 280  and junior/senior standing.
  
  •  

    CS 391. Cyber Security (3)


    The study and implementation of cyber security practices required to protect and restore information security systems from malicious attacks and insider threats. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in CS 390 .
  
  •  

    CS 407. Independent Study in CIS (1-3)


    Independent study in computer information systems. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of students. Class meetings and/or computer programs required. Maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    CS 408. Selected Topics in Computer Information Systems (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, and discussions on subject matter so current that it is not generally included in other course offerings. Use of the Internet is part of this course. Offered on an irregular basis, based on student need and interest. Prerequisites: Senior standing.
  
  •  

    CS 460. Computer Information Systems Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of computer information systems theories and concepts. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.
  
  •  

    CS 470. Systems Analysis (3)


    Introduces structured and alternative analytical and design processes for use in the development and implementation of business information systems. Includes systems life cycle and rapid application development and explores the role of CASE tools in systems design and development. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 472. Database Management (3)


    The course addresses database organization, design, implementation, and management. Topics include types of databases, data normalization, administration, and n-tier applications for DBMS access and management. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 480. Systems Project (3)


    This course represents an information systems capstone experience. Students integrate materials learned within their preceding courses toward demonstrating the ability to synthesize and apply information systems concepts among various simulated business and organizational decisions and scenarios strategically, tactically, and operationally. Prerequisites: Senior status.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (CEP)

  
  •  

    CEP 101. Parallel Cooperative Education I (No credit)


    1st Training Period Prerequisites: 24 hours of academic credit, a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, declare a major, complete Employability Seminar, acceptance into the cooperative education program, and payment of materials fee.
  
  •  

    CEP 102. Parallel Cooperative Education II (No credit)


    2nd Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 101 
  
  •  

    CEP 111. Alternating Cooperative Education I (No credit)


    1st Training Period Prerequisites: 24 hours of academic credit, a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, declare a major, complete Employability Seminar, acceptance into the program, and payment of materials fee.
  
  •  

    CEP 112. Alternating Cooperative Education II (No credit)


    2nd Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 111 
  
  •  

    CEP 201. Parallel Cooperative Education III (No credit)


    3rd Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 102 
  
  •  

    CEP 202. Parallel Cooperative Education IV (No credit)


    4th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 201 
  
  •  

    CEP 211. Alternating Cooperative Education III (No credit)


    3rd Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 112 
  
  •  

    CEP 212. Alternating Cooperative Education IV (No credit)


    4th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 211 
  
  •  

    CEP 301. Parallel Cooperative Education V (No credit)


    5th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 202 
  
  •  

    CEP 302. Parallel Cooperative Education VI (No credit)


    6th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 301 
  
  •  

    CEP 311. Alternating Cooperative Education V (No credit)


    5th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 212 
  
  •  

    CEP 312. Alternating Cooperative Education VI (No credit)


    6th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 311 
  
  •  

    CEP 401. Parallel Cooperative Education VII (No credit)


    7th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 302 
  
  •  

    CEP 402. Parallel Cooperative Education VIII (No credit)


    8th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 401 
  
  •  

    CEP 411. Alternating Cooperative Education VII (No credit)


    7th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 312 
  
  •  

    CEP 412. Alternating Cooperative Education VIII (No credit)


    8th Training Period Prerequisites: CEP 411 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ)

  
  •  

    CJ 200. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)


    An overview of the history, development, and philosophies of crime control in a democratic society. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of agencies and processes involved in the administration of criminal justice.
  
  •  

    CJ 221. Law Enforcement (3)


    An examination of the function of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and the actual function of the officers of such agencies.
  
  •  

    CJ 260. Corrections (3)


    An examination of the function of the local state and federal systems of correction and the actual functions of corrections officers.
  
  •  

    CJ 499. Criminal Justice Practicum (3)


    Students will work a minimum of 90 hours under a qualified professional in a law enforcement (or related) facility. For Sociology Criminal Justice Track majors only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites:   ,  , at least 18 hours in CJ/SY beyond the 100 level, and written permission of the Chairperson.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (CE)

  
  •  

    CE 304. Literature for Young Children (3)


    Study of award winning and notable books for young children. Emphasis is placed on lesson plans related to literature.
  
  •  

    CE 310. Introduction to Childhood Education (3)


    Childhood Education as a career with analysis and evaluation of model programs, effective classroom practices, and historical basis. Fingerprinting is a course requirement. Prerequisites: Junior standing.
  
  •  

    CE 311. Thematic Teaching (3)


    An introduction to thematic teaching as an integrated approach to teaching language arts, science, social science, and mathematics.
  
  •  

    CE 316. Family Life and Parent Education (3)


    Sociological and psychological impact of family and society on development of children from infancy through childhood. Prerequisites: Junior standing.
  
  •  

    CE 317. Early Childhood Programs/Children Special Needs (3)


    This course will encompass the characteristics, needs, and assessment of exceptional children during the preschool years. Needs and involvement of families will be an important emphasis.
  
  •  

    CE 411. Developmentally Appropriate Practice (3)


    An introduction to Developmentally Appropriate Practice in designing curriculum for young children based on standards from the National Association for the Education of Young Children.
  
  •  

    CE 412. The Importance of Play (3)


    Focus on the development of academic and socio-emotional competencies developed through play.
  
  •  

    CE 413. Health and Nutrition in Early Childhood (3)


    An overview of nutrition, food services, health promotion, and safety performance standards for child care providers.
  
  •  

    CE 419. Early Childhood Practicum (12)


    Students are placed in a child care facility for one full semester for a practical experience in curriculum development and teaching.
  
  •  

    CE 497. Independent Study in Early Childhood Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified undergraduate student an opportunity for independent study in early childhood education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean.
  
  •  

    CE 498. Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussions, and laboratory experiences in early childhood education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean.

EARTH SCIENCE (ES)

  
  •  

    ES 100. Introduction to Geology (4)


    Survey of geology, weather and climate, and astronomy, with limited coverage of pedology and oceanography. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    ES 307. Independent Study in Earth Science (1-6)


    Independent study in the earth sciences. Content and nature of the course determined by individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to three semester hours per term, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    ES 408. Selected Topics in Earth Science (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics to be covered from within the fields of weather and climate, astronomy, oceanography, limnology, and pedology. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Earth Science/Geology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    ES 468. Selected Topics in Ocean Science (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics to be covered from within the fields of coastal weather and climate, oceanography, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of earth science or geology and permission of the instructor and the Dean. Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.

ECONOMICS (EC)

  
  •  

    EC 201. Principles of Microeconomics (3)


    Basic principles of microeconomic analysis, including supply, demand, elasticity, production, cost, market structures, and economic problems. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MH 101  or ACT math subscore of 20 or higher or other appropriate standardized test score.
  
  •  

    EC 202. Principles of Macroeconomics (3)


    Basic principles of macroeconomic analysis, including national income, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and economic growth. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    EC 301. Intermediate Microeconomics (3)


    Advanced examination of the theory of price, distribution, and value under pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in   and   and “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    EC 302. Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)


    Study of the forces determining the level of income, employment, and growth in the economic system. Uses and coordination of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in   and   and “C” or higher in  .
  
  •  

    EC 407. Independent Study in Economics (1-3)


    Independent study in economics. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the students. Required research paper and projects. Maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    EC 408. Selected Topics in Economics (1-3)


    Readings, lectures, and discussions on subject matter so current that it is not generally included in other course offerings. Use of the Internet is part of this course. Offered on an irregular basis, based on student need and interest. Prerequisites: Senior standing.
  
  •  

    EC 410. Economic Forecasting and Analysis (3)


    An applied course in the modeling of economic and financial variables using time series methods. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in   and  “C” or higher in  .
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 -> 10