2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue 
    
    Nov 26, 2020  
2016 - 2017 Graduate Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions | 4


Abbreviation of Courses

Accounting (AC)
Anthropology (AN)
Biology (BY)
Business Administration (BA)
Business Quantitative Analysis (BQ)
Chemistry (CH)
College Teaching (CT)
Community Counseling (CC)
Computer Information Systems (CS)
Cooperative Education (CEP)
Early Childhood Education (CE)
Earth Science (ES)
Economics (EC)
Education (ED)
Educational Psychology (EP)
Elementary Education (EE)
English (EH)
Environmental Science (EN)
Finance (FI)

History (HY)
Instructional Leadership (IL)
Journalism (JN)
Library Media (LM)
Management (MN)
Marketing (MK)
Mathematics (MH)
Online Teaching (OT)
Physical Education (PE)
Political Science (PS)
Psychology (PY)
School Counseling (SC)
Sociology (SY)
Special Education (SE)
Speech (SH)
Student Affairs (SA)
Teacher Leader (TL)
Theatre (TH)

The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at the University of West Alabama is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

The University of West Alabama uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

500-599 — courses for masters-level students
600-699 — courses for Education Specialist-level students

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

MATHEMATICS (MH)

  
  •  

    MH 550. Linear Optimization (3)


    This course introduces the student to optimization theory and its applications. Topics include formulation of linear programs, simplex methods and duality, sensitivity analysis, transportation and networks, and various geometric concepts. Prerequisites: Previous course in linear algebra.
  
  •  

    MH 580. Technology for Mathematics Teachers (4)


    Introduces the high school mathematics teacher to modern technological methods of teaching mathematics available in high schools today. Includes the use of manipulatives, the graphing calculator, and the computer as well as mathematical applications for each. Three lecture and two laboratory hours required. Counts as an elective for mathematics education students only. Prerequisites: MH 223 Multivariable Calculus (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    MH 584. Mathematics for Teachers (3)


    A study of real and complex numbers, functions and their properties, equations, integers and polynomials for teachers. Research project is required.
  
  •  

    MH 590. History of Mathematics (3)


    Historical development of mathematical concepts and symbolism, evolution of modern mathematics from its motivational roots in the physical sciences, and lives and contributions of outstanding mathematicians, as well as topics related to contemporary mathematics. Prerequisites: MH 122 Calculus II or 12 semester hours of mathematics beyond MH 121 Calculus I (see Undergraduate Catalog at catalog.uwa.edu).
  
  •  

    MH 593. Logic and Set Theory (3)


    Provides a rigorous foundation in logic and elementary discrete mathematics to students of mathematics and computer science. Topics from logic include modeling English propositions, propositional calculus, quantification, and elementary predicate calculus. Additional mathematical topics include elements of set theory, mathematical induction, relations and functions, and elements of number theory. Prerequisites: Previous courses in advanced mathematics.
  
  •  

    MH 595. Number Theory (3)


    Survey of the types of arguments to prove facts about divisibility of integers, prime numbers, and modular congruencies. Other topics, such as the Fermat theorem, Euler’s theorem, and the law of quadratic reciprocity, will be discussed. Prerequisites: Previous courses in advanced mathematics.
  
  •  

    MH 596. Graph Theory and Application (3)


    Survey of several of the main ideas of general graph theory with applications to network theory. Topics include oriented and nonoriented linear graphs, spanning trees, branching and connectivity, accessibility, planar graphs, networks and flows, matching, and applications. Prerequisites: Previous courses in advanced mathematics.
  
  •  

    MH 597. Directed Studies in Mathematics (1-8)


    Independent study and research in mathematics. Content and nature of the courses determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. Research projects and papers are required. May be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    MH 598. Selected Topics in Mathematics (1-8)


    Nature and content of the course are determined by the interests and needs of the students. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    MH 599. Thesis in Mathematics (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.

ONLINE TEACHING (OT)

  
  •  

    OT 500. Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning (3)


    Overview of the historical perspective of the evolution of online teaching, challenges and advantages of establishing distance learning courses or programs. Introduction to learning theories and different types of online teaching course designs and educational technologies.
  
  •  

    OT 501. Course Design and Development in Online Education (3)


    Examination of course design, development, implementation and evaluation and the concept of building community. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    OT 502. Instructional Technology Tools (3)


    Examination of the connection between instructional tools and sound teaching pedagogy. Exploration of best practices, emerging techniques, and technology to enhance the creation and design of online learning courses or programs. Prerequisites:  .
  
  •  

    OT 509. Teaching Online Practicum (3)


    Supervised eight week online field-based experience in design, delivery, and evaluation of online instruction to an appropriate student population. Prerequisites:   , and   with no grade below a “B.”

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE)

  
  •  

    PE 503. Physical Education Workshop (1-3)


    Practical needs workshop on current topic. Lecture and performance oriented. Specific content and nature of course are determined by student needs. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours.
  
  •  

    PE 509. Internship (3)


    Supervised internship of at least 300 clock hours in the area of emphasis or site approved by course instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: At least six hours of graduate-level physical education courses, letter of agreement from the host institution, and approval of both the supervising faculty member and the department chair. A criminal background check and proof of professional liability insurance may be required prior to starting internship hours depending upon the host institution requirements.
  
  •  

    PE 510. Protective Techniques for Injuries (3)


    Taping and wrapping techniques used in athletic training including instruction in fabricating and applying protective equipment, pads, splints, and supports. Hands-on practical experience emphasized in laboratory sessions. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 520. Physical Education in the Elementary School (3)


    Ways to meet the developmental needs of the elementary school child. Games, rhythms, and self-testing activities for elementary children. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 521. Measurement and Evaluation in Human Performance (3)


    Review and practice with descriptive and inferential statistics used in human performance testing and research.
  
  •  

    PE 522. The Physical Education Curriculum (3)


    Underlying philosophies and foundations of physical education curriculum. Basis of selection of activities, methods of teaching, measurement and evaluation, and selection of facilities. Curriculum development in area of special interest. Research project required.
  
  •  

    PE 523. Adapted Physical Education (3)


    Types of disabilities encountered among public school pupils. Examination of obligations and responsibilities of the school and individual teacher in providing a program for the disabled students. Special project required.
  
  •  

    PE 524. Teaching Aspects of Physical Education (3)


    Develop competencies in methods of teaching physical education. Includes trends and issues, instructional strategies, exploration of teaching tools and resources, classroom management, and evaluation of pupil performance. Practicum hours are required.
  
  •  

    PE 531. Supervision in Physical Education (3)


    Study of role of physical education supervisor in working with teachers at different levels. Processes involved in working effectively with groups of teachers in democratic manner. Term project required.
  
  •  

    PE 532. Organization and Administration in Human Performance (3)


    Concepts used in organization and administration of human performance programs. Management of personnel, equipment, supplies, facilities, finances, and records will be topics of discussion/lecture. Professional development and legal liability will also be addressed. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 533. Athletic Administration Seminar (3)


    Assist athletic directors and coaches in meeting increasing responsibilities of modern school athletic programs. Topics include problems in organizing and directing boys and girls (men and women) athletic programs. All levels of educational structure are considered.
  
  •  

    PE 534. Sport and Exercise Law (3)


    Legal aspects of sports activities and human performance. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 535. Accounting and Economics in Sports (3)


    Exploration of financial issues pertaining to the sport industry. Emphasis placed on professional and collegiate sport. Topics include the creation of balance sheets, income statements, cash basis versus accrual basis accounting; financial impact analysis, attendance/ticket sales analysis, and relationships between financial analysis and strategic planning are explored.
  
  •  

    PE 537. Sport Management and Marketing (3)


    Examination of strategic marketing, advertising, and public relation concepts in sport. The course covers elements of marketing research, licensing and merchandising, event marketing, sponsorship, and corporate advertising. The course will also focus on public and media relations with a special focus on message development, image building, and crisis management of sport organizations. Project Required.
  
  •  

    PE 539. Sport Management Practicum (3)


    Designed to provide graduate students with opportunities for practical experience in a professional field setting.
  
  •  

    PE 540. Techniques of Research in Human Performance (3)


    Methods and techniques in research. Requirements include: analyzing current research, developing a competency in research writing, and conducting a research project.
  
  •  

    PE 542. Sport and Exercise Nutrition (3)


    The role of diet in human performance. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 543. Kinesiology (3)


    Musculoskeletal system and body movements involved in various motor skills. Analysis of body movement studied through manual muscle testing and application of mechanical principles. Paper or project required.
  
  •  

    PE 544. Exercise Physiology (3)


    Human adaptation to exercise and training. Paper or project required.
  
  •  

    PE 545. The Nature and Basis of Movement (3)


    Study of human movement from standpoints of teaching and learning. Relevance of anatomy, physiology, and psychology to motor learning and effects of motor learning on each factor. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 549. Exercise and Wellness Practicum (3)


    Designed to provide graduate students with opportunities for practical application of relevant theories in a professional setting.
  
  •  

    PE 550. Fitness Management (3)


    Coursework includes how management handles payroll, facility issues, safety, staffing, recruitement, and equipment purchases.
  
  •  

    PE 551. Exercise Testing and Prescription (3)


    A standardized curriculum to train and develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities for the exercise and fitness professional.
  
  •  

    PE 565. Psychology and Sociology of Human Performance (3)


    Psychological and sociological aspects of human performance. Project required.
  
  •  

    PE 570. Development of Strength and Conditioning Programs (3)


    The development and administration of strength, endurance, flexibility, speed, and agility programs.
  
  •  

    PE 572. Performance Enhancement Specialist (3)


    Designed for athletic trainers, chiropractors, physical therapists, coaches and other sports professionals who want to work with players at all levels, from the secondary education and university tier, to professional and Olympic level athletes. With course completion, students may sit for the NASM Performance Enhancement Specialist (NASM PES) certification exam. Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in related field or approval of Department Chair.
  
  •  

    PE 573. Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3)


    Current athletic training practices, procedures, techniques, and aids studied are in relation to physical education teachers and athletic coaches. Practical aspects of athletic injury prevention, care, treatment, and rehabilitation to be used in secondary school level programs.
  
  •  

    PE 574. Corrective Exercise Specialist (3)


    Provides the advanced knowledge, skills and abilities to successfully work with clients suffering from musculoskeletal impairments, imbalances or post-rehabilitation concerns. With course completion, students may sit for the NASM Corrective Exercise Specialist (NASM CES) certification exam. Prerequisites: Bachelor’s degree in related field or approval of Department Chair.
  
  •  

    PE 575. Emergency Management of Athletic Injuries (1-3)


    Current methods of emergency medical treatment of athletic injuries, proper recognition, management, and transportation of acute athletic injuries/illnesses. Presentations and some experience in taping and evaluation provided. Course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit.
  
  •  

    PE 576. Sports Medicine Seminar and Workshop (1-3)


    Current knowledge, philosophies, and trends in sports medicine and athletic training. Prevention, recognition, treatment, and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries/illnesses. Presentations and some experiences in taping and evaluation provided. Course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours.
  
  •  

    PE 586. Intramural and Non-Competitive Activities (3)


    Planning and administration of an intramural sports program. Research project required.
  
  •  

    PE 597. Independent Study in Physical Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified graduate student an opportunity for independent study in physical education. Specific content and nature of courses are demonstrated by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    PE 598. Selected Topics in Physical Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in physical education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    PE 599. Thesis (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursing the thesis option. Normally students enrolled in the course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward a Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean of the College.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS)

  
  •  

    PS 507. Problems in American Government for the Secondary Teacher (3)


    American political system considered in terms of contemporary concepts of political theory and high school curriculum. Research papers required.
  
  •  

    PS 598. Selected Topics in Political Science (3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings.

PSYCHOLOGY (PY)

  
  •  

    PY 500. Master’s Thesis Research (3)


    Individual investigations related to thesis research.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Written permission from the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    PY 501. Statistics and Research Methods I (3)


    Statistical concepts and research methods appropriate to the data, and theories in psychology: Basic statistics to Analysis of Variance.
  
  •  

    PY 502. Statistics and Research Methods II (3)


    Statistical concepts and research methods appropriate to the data, and theories in psychology: Basic correlation to Multiple Regression.
  
  •  

    PY 505. Professional Developmental in Psychology (1)


    Exploration of professional development strategies for students seeking continuing education or employment in psychology or related fields.
  
  •  

    PY 510. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)


    An in depth examination of theoretical and empirical work in developmental psychology:  emphasizing biological, cognitive, language, and social development.
  
  •  

    PY 512. Psychology of Emotion (3)


    An investigation into theory, research, and application of the study of emotions.
  
  •  

    PY 515. Advanced Sports Psychology (3)


    An in depth investigation of the theories and applications within the field of Sports Psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 520. The Diagnostic Process for Mental Disorders (3)


    Exploration of the process of diagnosis and treatment planning for categorized mental illnesses according to the current system of classification.
  
  •  

    PY 525. Personality Assessment (3)


    Introduction to the theory and utilization of various assessment techniques in the analysis of personality.
  
  •  

    PY 526. Marriage and Family Therapy (3)


    Introduction to the field of marriage and family therapy.
  
  •  

    PY 527. The Therapeutic Relationship (3)


    Introduction to the understanding of the broad philosophies in building and maintaining the therapeutic relationship.
  
  •  

    PY 528. Health Psychology (3)


    Introduction to the study of the interface between psychology and medicine.
  
  •  

    PY 529. Psychopharmacology (3)


    The practical understanding and application of how and why psychoactive drugs (therapeutic and illicit) affect thoughts and behaviors.
  
  •  

    PY 530. Advanced Social Psychology (3)


    A theoretical investigation of the influence of the social world on our thoughts and behaviors.
  
  •  

    PY 535. Advanced Techniques in Family Counseling (3)


    An investigation into advanced topics and issues in family counseling.
  
  •  

    PY 540. Advanced Cognitive Psychology (3)


    An in depth examination into theoretical and empirical work on human cognition.
  
  •  

    PY 541. Techniques of Counseling (3)


    The approaches to counseling with an emphasis on individual and group counseling, the counseling interview, ethical/legal considerations, consultation, referral, crisis counseling, and counseling research.
  
  •  

    PY 544. Exercise Physiology (3)


    Human adaptation to exercise and training. Paper or project required.
  
  •  

    PY 550. Theories of Personality (3)


    Comparative examination of representative theoretical approaches to the nature, determinants, and dynamics of personality structure.
  
  •  

    PY 555. Systems Theory in Psychology (3)


    An examination of the principles of systems theory within psychology.
  
  •  

    PY 560. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3)


    Examination of characteristics, interpretations, uses and misuses of standardized psychological tests.
  
  •  

    PY 563. Assessment Techniques in Family Counseling (3)


    An investigation into psychological assessment techniques in family counseling.
  
  •  

    PY 565. Psychology and Sociology of Human Performance (3)


    Psychological and sociological aspects of human performance. Project required.
  
  •  

    PY 570. Systems of Psychotherapy (3)


    Analysis of the theories and techniques of current systems of psychotherapy.
  
  •  

    PY 590. Master’s Thesis (1-3)


    Thesis. Prerequisites: written permission of the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    PY 595. Professional Orientation and Ethics (3)


    Study of professional roles and functions; professional organizations and associations; ethical and legal standards; professional credentials; practice management; and procedures for licensure and certification.
  
  •  

    PY 597. Selected Topics in Psychology (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, and discussions of topics not generally included in course offerings. Course content and format determined by student needs and interests. A maximum of six hours may be earned in this course. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    PY 598. Psychology Practicum (3)


    Students will work 100 hours under a qualified professional in a mental health (or related) facility. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: At least a 3.0 GPA in graduate courses, PY 550 , PY 520  or PY 570 , PY 526  or PY 527 , no grade below a “B” in the required courses, and written permission of the Chairperson.
  
  •  

    PY 599. Internship in Counseling Psychology (3)


    Full-time supervised internship of at least 600 clock-hours duration at mental health (or related) facility. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: At least a 3.0 GPA in graduate courses, PY 550 , PY 520  or PY 570 , PY 526  or PY 527 , no grade below a “B” in the required courses, and written permission of the Chairperson.

SOCIOLOGY (SY)

  
  •  

    SY 517. Contemporary Social Problems for the Secondary Teacher (3)


    Current problems arising from social institutions such as the family, church, school, and community. Content chosen with concern for relevance to secondary school curriculum. Research projects and papers required.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SE)

  
  •  

    SE 500. Introduction to Special Education (3)


    Introduction to programs and problems of children and youth who deviate from the average in physical, mental, emotional, and social characteristics.
  
  •  

    SE 501. Characteristics and Strategies for Special Needs Students (3)


    This course focuses on the characteristics of special needs students. The current service delivery systems and current methodologies utilized.
  
  •  

    SE 502. Developing Receptive and Expressive Communication Skills (3)


    Development of receptive and expressive communication and language arts skills. Assessment and remediation skills including current assistive technology.
  
  •  

    SE 503. Seminar in Behavior Management (3)


    Concepts and principles of behavior change and management; practical experience in developing behavior management plans to prevent and remedy behavior problems.
  
  •  

    SE 504. Seminar in Special Education Issues (3)


    Current topics in special education, including curriculum, technology, family and student diversity.
  
  •  

    SE 506. Teaching the Severely and Profoundly Disabled (3)


    Characteristics, teaching techniques, management strategies and assistive devices for the severely and profoundly disabled.
  
  •  

    SE 508. Assistive Technology and the Law (3)


    An introduction to the law in regard to assistive technology in the work place. Students are exposed to a range of devices, strategies, services and practices that address needs of special needs employees and students. Students will gain knowledge from research and best practices in order to be able to create an implementation plan for assistive technology.
  
  •  

    SE 552. Methods for the Collaborative Teacher/Special Education K-6 (3)


    Individual and collaborative teacher instructional planning, strategies, materials and curriculum, delivery models e.g., resource, self-contained, and inclusive settings for the elementary collaborative teacher.
  
  •  

    SE 554. Methods for the Collaborative Teacher/Special Education 6-12 (3)


    Individual and collaborative teacher instructional planning, strategies, materials and curriculum, transition, delivery models e.g., resource, self-contained, and inclusive settings for the middle and secondary collaborative teacher.
  
  •  

    SE 558. Practicum in Special Education K-6 (3)


    Supervised work stressing special education instructional and assessment competencies in a teaching situation for students in grades K-6.
  
  •  

    SE 559. Practicum in Special Education 6-12 (3)


    Supervised work stressing special education instructional and assessment competencies in a teaching situation with students in grades 6-12.
  
  •  

    SE 597. Independent Study in Special Education (1-3)


    Offers the qualified graduate student an opportunity for independent study in special education. Specific content and nature of courses are determined by student needs and interests. Research papers required. One to three semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SE 598. Selected Topics in Special Education (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures, discussion, and laboratory experiences in special education not generally included in course offerings. Specific content and nature of the course determined by student needs and interests. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    SE 599. Thesis in Special Education (1-3)


    A thesis evidencing research capacity, independent thought and the ability to interpret materials is required of students pursuing the thesis option. Normally students enroll in this course continuously from the inception of their thesis project until the final document is approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A maximum of six semester hours in this course will be counted toward the Master’s degree. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean.
  
  •  

    SE 600. Assistive Technology (3)


    This course will provide students with an introduction to a range of devices, strategies, services and practices that make up the field of assistive technology. Students will gain practical hands-on experience as well as knowledge from research and best practices in order to be able to create an implementation plan for assistive technology.
  
  •  

    SE 601. Inclusive Practices and Transitions (3)


    This course will provide students with recent research on inclusive practices and transition services for students with disabilities occurring from early childhood through early adulthood.
  
  •  

    SE 602. Positive Counseling Services for Teachers and Families (3)


    The course will provide students with developing skills counselors use to communicate with students, colleagues, parents and community. Participants will develop an awareness of issues in working with students with disabilities and recognizing their needs in the classroom.
  
  •  

    SE 603. Advanced Measurement and Assessment in Special Education (3)


    This course will focus on administering, scoring, interpreting and reporting on achievement, special skill and diagnostic tests used in special education. The emphasis will be on diagnosis and prescriptive writing.
  
  •  

    SE 604. Methods and Materials for Gifted and Talented (3)


    The course is designed to prepare the collaborative teacher in developing strategies and materials appropriate for the gifted and talented child in the K-12 setting.
  
  •  

    SE 605. Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)


    This course is designed to assist collaborative special education teachers in devising and implementing specific strategies in advanced behavior management and training strategies, field-based teacher research methods and effective support for classroom teachers.
 

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