2011 - 2012 General Catalogue 
    
    Dec 07, 2021  
2011 - 2012 General Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The Unit of Credit

The unit of credit at UWA is the semester hour. One semester hour represents one hour of class work or two hours of laboratory work each week throughout the semester. Two hours per week of out-of-class preparation is usually required for each semester hour of credit.

The Numbering System

UWA uses a three-digit numbering system. The first digit designates the level of the course, as follows:

000-099 — compensatory courses
100-199 — courses primarily for freshmen
200-299 — courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores
300-499 — courses primarily for upper-level undergraduate students (juniors and seniors)

The second digit is reserved to the department to designate relevant classifications of courses within the respective disciplines. The third digit is used to designate sequence of courses (but not necessarily prerequisites) or to distinguish a special type of course, such as independent study.

 

Biology

  
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    BY 233 . Applied Nutrition (3)


    Metabolic functions of essential nutrients and their relation to the growth and maintenance of the body. Nutritional requirements of different age levels and dietary assessment. Clinical application of diet therapy is emphasized. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 232 .
  
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    BY 234 . Medical Terminology (3)


    Medical vocabulary, spelling, pronunciation, and word-building using prefixes, root words, and suffixes. Designed primarily for students in allied health and pre-professional areas of medicine. Three lecture per week. Prerequisites: BY 231  and BY 232 .
  
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    BY 240 . Applied Microbiology (4)


    Biology of microorganisms with emphasis on their relation to other organisms and to the health of humans. Cannot be used to satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 232 .
  
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    BY 289 . Laboratory Practicum (1)


    Provides an introduction to the planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory and/or field activities. Emphasis on use of laboratory equipment, safety regulations, hazardous waste disposal and teaching resources. Two contact hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    BY 307 . Independent Study in Biology (1-8)


    Independent study in the biological sciences. Content and nature of the courses are determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    BY 308 . Seminar in Biology (1)


    Use of the library and methods of literature search including computer access of literature databases. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: BY 212  or BY 222 .
  
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    BY 309 . Biological Science Internship (1-4)


    Open only to majors in biology. The student, working with an assigned biology faculty member, applies for an internship at an approved site. The internship must be approved by the Dean. The student provides a written report at the end of the internship to the assigned biology faculty member. This report, with an evaluation by the intern director at the site, is the basis on which a letter grade is assigned. This course may be repeated for a maximum of four semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology.
  
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    BY 314 . Trees and Shrubs of Alabama (4)


    Woody plants in natural environments, with emphasis on identification, taxonomy, and economic importance of trees and shrubs of the Southeastern U.S. Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
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    BY 320 . Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    Survey of invertebrate phyla, emphasizing morphology, physiology, and phylogenetic relationships. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
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    BY 330 . Hematology (4)


    Human blood cells, blood forming organs, and abnormalities involving these cells and/or organs. Cell morphology, methods of cell enumeration, and basic hematology testing are emphasized. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
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    BY 331 . Immunology (4)


    Host defense against infectious agents, emphasis on mechanisms of humoral immunity (antigens/antibodies), cellular immunity, and hypersensitivities. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
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    BY 340 . Microbiology (4)


    Concepts and techniques relating to the morphology, taxonomy, physiology, and culture methods of microbes, with emphasis on those of special importance to humans. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 101  or BY 103 . Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 111 .
  
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    BY 367 . Independent Study in Marine Biology (1-8)


    Independent study in marine biology and/or a related area of the marine sciences. Content and nature of the courses are determined by the individual needs and interests of the student. One or more research projects and papers are required. One to four semester hours per semester, may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean. (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 380 . Genetics (4)


    Basic principles of heredity and their significance. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 , BY 222 , and CH 111 .
  
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    BY 389 . Advanced Laboratory Practicum in Biology (1)


    This course will provide advanced training in the planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory and/or field activities in a specific area of biology. Emphasis is on techniques specific to a particular discipline within the field. Five contact hours per week. This course may be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Twenty semester hours in biology and permission of instructor and Dean.
  
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    BY 392 . History of Life on Earth (4)


    A survey of life and geological settings through time, including methods, principles of evolution and stratigraphy, practical experience with collecting and analyzing fossils, and cultural implications. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Eight hours of biology and GE 102 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BY 393 . Paleontology (4)


    Taxonomic principles; identification, characteristics, and evolution of the geologically important fossil groups; principles of biostratigraphy; and the cataloguing of fossils collected in the field. Includes several local and one day field trips. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology and permission of Dean. Corequisites: Recommended GE 102  or ES 100  as prerequisites or corequisites.
  
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    BY 400 . Senior Seminar (1)


    A capstone course in which students of biological students consolidate their academic experience and develop skills necessary to enter the work force or to further their education in graduate programs of biological or environmental sciences. This course will also be used to evaluate the efficacy to which departmental objectives are being accomplished. To be taken the last semester of the degree program unless earlier permission is granted by the Chairperson.
  
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    BY 404 . Research Design and Data Analysis (3)


    A study of the planning, organizing, and implementing of scientific research experiments. Computer based data treatment, graphing, and analysis methods are covered in detail. Prerequisites: MH 114  and 20 hours in biology and/or environmental sciences
  
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    BY 408 . Selected Topics in Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as aquatic biology, biological illustrations, helminthology, histology, protozoology, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    BY 410 . Field Botany (4)


    Methods for the collection and identification of vascular plants in natural environments, including plant identification, taxonomy, systematics, collection, preservation, and ecological interactions. Includes one weekend field trip. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
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    BY 413 . Advanced Plant Biology (4)


    Evolution, morphology, anatomy, reproduction, and classification of land plants (bryophytes, ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, flowering plants and fossil lineages). Prerequisites: BY 212 .
  
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    BY 414 . Marine Botany (4)


    Structure, reproduction, identification, distribution, and ecology of marine and estuarine algae, vascular, and nonvascular plants. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory work per week. Prerequisites: BY 212 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 420 . Field Zoology (4)


    A detailed study of the fauna of western Alabama, including collection, identification, taxonomy, systematics, preservation, and ecological interactions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 .
  
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    BY 424 . Marine Invertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, ecology, physiology, and phylogenetic relationship of locally occurring marine invertebrate taxa. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . BY 320  highly recommended. (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 425 . Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Systematics, behavior, physiology, and ecology of marine vertebrates with emphasis on species of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 426 . Coastal Ornithology (4)


    Distribution, population dynamics, food habits, habitat analysis, and field identification of coastal and pelagic birds in Alabama. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 222 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 427 . Marine Behavioral Ecology (4)


    Examines how animal behavior is influenced by and interacts with the environment, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of these behaviors in a marine setting. Prerequisites: BY 222  and MH 246 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 428 . Vertebrate Zoology (4)


    Survey of vertebrate classes emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology and ecology. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology, including BY 222 .
  
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    BY 429 . Entomology (4)


    Survey of the insects, emphasizing their evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BY 222  and sixteen additional hours of biology.
  
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    BY 431 . Histology (4)


    A study of the microscopic anatomy of tissue of vertebrates, particularly mammals. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 222 , BY 231 , BY 232  and an additional four hours of biology at 200 level or higher.
  
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    BY 441 . Environmental Toxicology (4)


    Overview of concepts and terminology combining several diverse disciplines to investigate how society creates, regulates, and perceives the effects of toxic substances in the environment. Health issues and approaches to control the major environmental health problems associated with various occupations in industrialized and developing countries will also be examined. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 16 hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
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    BY 450 . Ecology (4)


    Relationship between individual organisms and their environment; the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems; and computer usage in data analysis and report writing. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and MH 246 .
  
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    BY 451 . Marine Ecology (4)


    Bioenergetics, community structure, population dynamics, predation, competition, and speciation in marine ecosystems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 112 , and PH 201 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 452 . Marsh Ecology (4)


    Floral and faunal elements and interaction of physical and biological factors of various marine marsh communities. Trips to regional examples of marsh types. Review and discussion of current literature. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 450  or BY 451 . (offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 453 . Appalachian Ecology (4)


    A study of the biodiversity and geology of the Appalachian Mountains with particular focus on unique biological communities and the impact of natural and anthropogenic events on the landscape and ecology. Prerequisites: 16 hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
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    BY 456 . Ecological Restoration (3)


    Exploration of basic principles of ecological restoration including physical, chemical, and biological manipulations required for restoration success. Additionally, this course will provide a detailed examination of practical aspects of restoration in selected ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: 20 hours in biology or environmental sciences or permission of the Dean.
  
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    BY 457 . Natural History of the Black Belt (3)


    The Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi is a unique and culturally significant region characterized by its geography, soils, prairies, and people. Experts in different fields survey the geography, history, archaeology, geologic history, paleontology, hydrology, biology, ecology, economics, and future of grassland, forest, aquatic, and urban environments of the Black Belt region. Three lecture hours per week and two Saturday field trips. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.
  
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    BY 458 . Subtropical Ecology (4)


    This course will provide an introduction to habitats and ecosystems of subtropical Florida. Students will gain insight into the natural and cultural history of some of the most unique and diverse habitats in North America. The course will include weekly meetings to discuss subtropical habitats, followed by a 7 day field trip. Upon return, students will develop a research paper and a presentation on a topic related to these habitats. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    BY 460 . Oceanography (4)


    General introduction to the ocean with emphasis on geological, chemical, and physical processes and how they relate to biological systems. Twenty-four hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 112 , and PH 201 . (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island).
  
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    BY 461 . Aquatic Biology (4)


    Limnological principles, field techniques, and qualitative and quantitative study of aquatic ecosystems, especially freshwater systems in West Central Alabama. Research project and paper are required. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , CH 111 .
  
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    BY 463 . Marine Technical Methods (2)


    The hardware of marine science, sampling procedures, processing, station location, and field maintenance operation. Ten hours of lecture/field work/laboratory per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 . (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 468 . Selected Topics in Marine Biology (1-4)


    Requirements and interests of students determine the topics offered, such as marine fisheries science, or others. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of biology and permission of the instructor and the Dean. (Offered only at the Marine Laboratory, Dauphin Island.)
  
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    BY 471 . Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules, the chemistry of buffers, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and the mechanism of enzyme action. An introduction to quantitative an analytical/organic techniques of biochemistry. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Pre or Corequisite CH 242 .
  
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    BY 472 . Cell Biology (4)


    Cells and subcellular structures and such cellular processes as energy transformation, transport of materials, and growth. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BY 212  and BY 222 , and CH 241 .
  
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    BY 474 . Human Physiology (4)


    This course is an in depth study of human medical physiology. Lab work will examine the underlying chemistry, physics, and biochemistry principles of body function. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BY 222  and sixteen hours of biology at 200 level or higher.
  
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    BY 490 . Evolutionary Theory (3)


    Advanced study of the modern synthesis of the theory of evolution by natural selection and Mendelian genetics.
  
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    BY 491 . Biogeography (3)


    Distribution patterns of organisms and the historical and ecological factors contributing to those patterns. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Twenty hours in biology.
  
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    BY 495 . Research in Biology (3)


    Research experience in the biological sciences in which the student learns to conduct research by engaging in an ongoing research project of the faculty in the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences. Prerequisites: Permission of Dean and Instructor.

Business Administration

  
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    BA 100 . Students in Free Enterprise Practicum (1)


    Active participation in multidisciplinary leadership experience with Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE). Emphasizes ethical business practices, use of technology, and fair treatment of all members of society. May be repeated for a maximum of four credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    BA 263 . Business Law and Legal Environment (3)


    Legal environment of business with respect to ethical, social and political influences. Legal principles applicable to business transactions. Contracts, torts, agency, employment law, and business organization
  
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    BA 271 . Introduction to Business Statistics (3)


    Introduction to basic concepts of statistics including descriptive statistics, elements of probability theory, sampling, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
  
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    BA 330 . Business Ethics (3)


    Social responsibility of business, including business ethics and business relationships with government, education, labor and the community. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300  and junior standing.
  
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    BA 363 . Advanced Business Law (3)


    Administrative law, intellectual property, securities law, property, investment, estates, and trusts, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, secured interest, banking and lease contracts. Prerequisites: BA 263 .
  
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    BA 371 . Advanced Business Statistics (3)


    Study of systems and estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square tests, correlation and linear regression. Includes the use of computer software packages and data analysis. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in BA 271 .
  
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    BA 400 . Professional Development Seminar (3)


    Principles and practices of business professional development. This course includes professional communications, interviewing skills and career planning strategies, facilitation and presentation skills, and business etiquette. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300 , and junior or senior standing.
  
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    BA 407 . Independent Study in Business (1-3)


    Independent study in business. Content and nature determined by individual needs and interests of the students. Required research paper and projects. Maximum of three hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
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    BA 408 . Selected Topics in Business (1-3)


    Critical readings, lectures and discussions of selected topics not generally included in course offerings. Content determined by student interest and need. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean.
  
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    BA 450 . International Business Seminar (3)


    An overview of the major forms of international business. A study of the impact of the world economy, international trade, and political and social environments on international management problems of business organizations. Prerequisites: MG 300 , MK 300 , FI 300  and junior standing.
  
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    BA 460 . Business Administration Internship (3)


    A work related experience in a private, public, or governmental organization enhancing the applications of business administration theories and concepts Prerequisites: Senior standing. Students may not register for this course until the application has been completed and approved by the Dean’s office.

Chemistry

  
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    CH 101 . Introductory General Chemistry (4)


    Basic principles of chemistry. Recommended for students with no previous background in chemistry. No credit is allowed for this course if a student has previous credit in chemistry. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
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    CH 102 . Introductory Organic Chemistry (4)


    A brief survey of organic functional groups, reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy Credit may not be applied toward a science major. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
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    CH 105 . Problem Solving in Chemistry (1)


    Focuses on methods to improve problem-solving skills. Designed to be taken concurrently with general or analytical chemistry by students who wish to improve their performance in applying mathematical concepts to solving chemical problems. Basic algebra and the properties of logarithms reviewed. Two hours per week. Prerequisites: None.
  
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    CH 111 . General Chemistry I (4)


    Examines chemical principles involving structure, properties, reactions, and organic chemistry, with laboratory experiments to demonstrate these principles. Every semester. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Students with an ACT math subscore of 23 or higher may take CH 111 concurrently with MH 113 . Prerequisites: MH 113 .
  
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    CH 112 . General Chemistry II (4)


    A continuation of CH 111. Examines chemical concepts in inorganic, analytical, and physical chemistry. Laboratory experiments emphasize qualitative analysis. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 111 
  
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    CH 241 . Organic Chemistry I (4)


    General principles and theories of organic chemistry including bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, functional groups, and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic molecules. Three lecture and four laboratory hours each week. Prerequisites: CH 112 .
  
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    CH 242 . Organic Chemistry II (4)


    Spectroscopy, nomenclature, and reaction mechanisms of carbonyl and polyfunctional organic compounds with applications in other disciplines. Organic synthesis and reactions of complex natural products and polymers. Three lecture and four laboratory hours each week. Prerequisites: CH 241 .
  
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    CH 289 . Laboratory Practicum (1)


    Provides an introduction to planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation of laboratory activities. Emphasis on use of laboratory equipment, safety regulations, hazardous waste disposal, setup of experiments and teaching resources. Two contact hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 112  and permission of the Instructor and the Dean.
  
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    CH 307 . Independent Study in Chemistry (1-4)


    Independent study in chemistry. Individual needs and interests of the student determine content and nature of the courses. One or more research projects are required. One to three semester hours per semester may be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor and the Dean.
  
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    CH 308 . Seminar in Chemistry (1)


    Use of the library and methods of literature search including computer access of literature databases. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester credit hours. Prerequisites: CH 242 .
  
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    CH 321 . Quantitative Analysis (4)


    Examines the theory and practice of volumetric, electrochemical, and spectrophotometric analysis applied to the study of stoichiometry and equilibrium. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 112 .
  
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    CH 341 . Organic Reactions and Mechanism (3)


    Studies advanced concepts of organic structure, reactions, synthesis, mechanisms and stereochemistry as applied to problem solving. Literature search, group presentation and interpretation of newly discovered synthetic methodology and natural products. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242 .
  
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    CH 351 . Physical Chemistry I (4)


    Examines equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics with applications to physical and chemical properties of matter. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242  and PH 212 . Prerequisite or corequisite: CH 321  or permission of instructor and Dean.
  
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    CH 352 . Physical Chemistry II (4)


    Examines quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242  and PH 212 , or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    CH 360 . Environmental Chemistry (3)


    A study of current and past environmental problems or disasters with an emphasis on chemical reactions, toxicology, fate and transport of chemicals in the environment. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of chemistry or permission of Dean.
  
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    CH 408 . Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-4)


    Nature and content of the course are determined by the interests and needs of the students. Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of chemistry and permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    CH 422 . Instrumental Analysis (4)


    Examines the theory and use of infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, atomic absorption, gas chromatography, thermal analysis, electrochemical analysis, and other instrumental methods of characterizing chemical structure. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 321 . Corequisites:   or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 423 . Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)


    In depth study of current research topics in analytical chemistry focusing on chromatography, mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, and IR/Raman spectroscopy. Three lecture hours per week and three laboratory hours per week. Corequisites:   or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
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    CH 431 . Inorganic Chemistry I (3)


    Examines advanced concepts in theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with emphasis on valence bond, molecular orbital, and crystal field theories. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 351 .
  
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    CH 432 . Inorganic Chemistry II (3)


    This course will cover the synthesis and characterization of inorganic materials. Extensive laboratory work is required. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 351 .
  
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    CH 441 . Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)


    Advanced study of reaction mechanisms, kinetics, spectroscopy, and topical organic chemistry including thermochemistry and photochemistry with an emphasis on molecular orbital theory. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 351 .
  
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    CH 455 . Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)


    A detailed study of modern computational chemistry. The course will emphasize semi-empirical and ab initio methods as well as the use of modern software packages. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites:    or permission of the instructor and the Dean.
  
  •  

    CH 471 . Biochemistry I (4)


    Structure and function of biological molecules, the chemistry of buffer, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates and the mechanism of enzyme action. An introduction of quantitative and analytical/organic techniques of biochemistry. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CH 242 .
  
  •  

    CH 472 . Biochemistry II (3)


    Study of metabolism including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, phosphorylation, photosynthesis and biosynthesis. Expression and transmission of genetic information. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 471  or BY 471 .
  
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    CH 480 . Forensic Chemistry (4)


    Investigation of the preparation and analysis of forensic samples from a chemical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used to analyze forensic evidence. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CH 242 .
  
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    CH 491 . Undergraduate Research (1-3)


    Student participation in a research project under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member. The course will result in the preparation and presentation of a comprehensive report. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and the Dean.

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CS 205 . Microcomputer Applications (3)


    Introductory computer concepts and microcomputer usage covering productivity software packages such as word processing, electronic spreadsheets, presentation software, and database management systems.
  
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    CS 210 . Introduction to CIS (3)


    An introduction to computer and information technology that includes an overview of the history of computing, fundamental computer concepts, current state of the art, and future directions in research.
  
  •  

    CS 300 . Programming I (3)


    The introductory computer programming course for CIS majors. Current programming concepts and program development principles and practices. The basic constructs of the programming languages are covered. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 210  and “C” or higher in MH 113 .
  
  •  

    CS 301 . Programming II (3)


    The second course in a series of programming courses for CIS majors. Includes more advanced concepts and object-oriented programming development principles. Introduces advanced constructs and addresses advanced data structures such as records, sequential files, pointers, and multi-dimensional arrays. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 305 . Computerized Data Analysis (3)


    Fundamentals of spreadsheets and proper usage of their commands, macros, and functions. Building spreadsheets, creating graphs and formulas for financial analysis by using Microsoft Excel. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 205  or “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
  •  

    CS 310 . Ethics in CIS (3)


    An introduction to theories of ethics as related to the use of computer and information technology and the associated social and ethical implications. Includes intellectual property, copyright, computer crime, ownership of personal data, freedom of speech, the right to privacy, and codes of ethical and professional conduct for IT practitioners. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300  and junior/senior standing or permission of the Dean.
  
  •  

    CS 315 . Project Management (3)


    A study of foundations of project management and project management techniques currently employed for business and information systems projects, including project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, and procurement. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in MG 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 320 . Visual Basic (3)


    Object-oriented programming using the Windows environment. Includes language basics, database interfacing and arrays. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 205  or “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
  •  

    CS 330 . Electronic/Mobile Commerce (3)


    Study of technical and business topics related to conducting business electronically. Includes models of e-business, digital currency and funds transfer, legal and regulatory considerations, security and privacy issues, and economic analysis or e- and m-commerce alternatives. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 380 .
  
  •  

    CS 340 . Operating Systems (3)


    Operating system theory and concepts including supervisory functions, management of files, processes, and memory. Includes some hands-on use of current operating systems such as UNIX, MS-DOS, and Windows. Network operating systems introduced through a local area network. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 .
  
  •  

    CS 350 . Internet Applications I (3)


    Fundamentals of creating and designing effective web pages, using XHTML, graphics, CSS, audio, and video files. Visual web development tools are used to enhance website appeal and functionality. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 205  or “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
  •  

    CS 351 . Internet Applications II (3)


    A continuation of Internet Applications I. XML and ASP are used to develop web sites for e- and m-commerce. Includes programming languages used in developing interactive websites and basic experience in the full development cycle, including website conception, client/server side programming, and web maintenance. Individual programming intensive web projects are required. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 300 , “C” or higher in CS 380  and “C” or higher in CS 350 .
  
  •  

    CS 370 . Data Structures (3)


    Advanced data structures including linked lists, trees, graphs, and networks and the algorithms used to manage these structures. Hands-on application in program development using these algorithms. Prerequisites: “C” or higher in CS 301 .
 

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